10 New Picture Books for Halloween

Oprn Drdsmr: Kid Lit Musings and Review by Cheli Mennella

10 New Picture Books for Halloween

Halloween is just days away. In our home there is a flurry of costume making and pumpkin carving and spider webbing as we countdown to the spookiest day of the year. And each evening, as the jack-o-lanterns glow in the dark, we take out the Halloween stories. This year, we’ve added a few new books to our nightly line-up.  Here are ten recently published picture books that prickle the spine, rattle the funny bone and charm the candy right into our hands!

Halloween Forest written by Marion Dane Bauer and illustrated by John Shelley. A cloaked child wanders into a forest of bones on Halloween, but is not scared by the spooky skeletal creatures. Instead the fearless traveler cries out to chase the creatures away and reveals a skeleton beneath the cloak. The scary becomes friendly and treats await to be sacked. (Holiday House, New York, 2012.  ISBN 978-0-82342-324-8)

Vampirina Ballerina written by Anne Marie Pace and illustrated by LeUyen Pham. A young vampire has some challenges to overcome as she practices ballet. From frightening her classmates and not being able to see her reflection in the mirror to dealing with stage fright on the night of her big debut. (Disney Hyperion, New York, 2012.  ISBN 978-1-42315-753-3

Sounds Spooky written by Christopher Cheng and illustrated by Sarah Davis. An old abandoned house is full of spooky sounds. But what are those new sounds? Is the house really empty? Lots of onomatopoeia and chant-like rhythm make for a good read aloud. The detailed pictures, created from photography, illustration, and computer wizardry, feature a model house made from cardboard and plaster and characters made from plasticene. (Random House Australia, 2012. ISBN 978-1-86471-879-9)

Trick or Treat written and illustrated by Leo Landry. When the ghost in the empty house at the end of the street throws a Halloween party, two invitations get mixed-up. When the unexpected guests arrive, there are both tricks and treats. A non-scary Halloween story about generosity and friendship. (Houghton Mifflin, Boston, 2012.  ISBN 978-0-54724-969-8)

A Halloween Treat written and illustrated by Edward Gorey. A back-to-back book featuring unpublished Gorey material. The first half is a short vignette about a trick or treat adventure. The other half is a wordless collection of Gorey ghosts. Charming, with a bit of spook and classic Gorey pen and ink. (Published by Bloomsbury, New York, 2012.  ISBN 978-1-60819-616-6)

Into the Pumpkin written and illustrated by Linda Franklin. In this beautifully illustrated book, readers journey inside a pumpkin to see how witches, bats, ravens, scarecrows, spiders, ghosts and other characters prepare to celebrate Halloween. (Schiffer Publishers, Atglen, PA, 2012. ISBN 978-0-76434-183-0)

Creepy Carrots! written by Aaron Reynolds and illustrated by Peter Brown. A parable about a rabbit who is always after carrots, until one day paranoia slinks in, and it seems as if the carrots are after him. The right amount of creep factor for a picture book about veggies, heightened by a palette of gray and orange. (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, New York, 2012.  ISBN 978-1-44240-297-3)

That One Spooky Night written by Dan Bar-el and illustrated by David Huyck. Three strange stories about one spooky night, when a broom searches for a witch and mermaids swim in the bathtub and a house party goes batty. Drawn in a comic book/graphic novel style, this 80-page book will appeal to older readers. (Kids Can Press, Toronto, 2012.  ISBN 978-1-55453-751-8)

Frankenstein by Ludworst Bemonster (written by Rick Walton and illustrated by Nathan Hale) is a parody of Ludwig Bemelmans’ classic story Madeleine. Of all the little monsters that live in the castle with spines, the ugliest one is Frankenstein. He can frighten anyone, until he loses his head. A monstrously funny twist on an old classic. (Feiwel & Friends of Macmillan, New York, 2012.  ISBN 978-0-31255-366-1)

The Monsters’ Monster written and illustrated by Patrick McDonnell. Three little monsters who all think they are the biggest and baddest monster, decide to build the biggest, baddest monster of all. But their creation turns out to be very different from what they imagined. A monster story with huge heart. (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, New York, 2012.  ISBN 978-0-31604-547-6)


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Cheli Mennella

Cheli has been involved with creative arts and education for most of her life, and has taught many subjects from art and books to yoga and zoology. But she has a special fondness for kid’s books, and has worked in the field for more than 20 years. She is a freelance writer and regular contributor to Valley Kids and teaches a course for adults in “Writing for Children.” She writes from Colrain, where she lives with her musician-husband, three children, and shelves full of kid’s books.

1 Comment

  1. August 19, 2013 at 9:42 pm

    I just came upon this now, and it warms my heart. I’ve spent quite a bit of time in Northampton so seeing this rec in Hilltown Families tickles me! Thank you!


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