Empowering Our Girls: Being a Role Model

19 Ways to be a Healthy Role Model for Your Daughter.

As we know, our children will learn more from what they see us doing, than what we tell them to do. Correct? Sometimes it is hard to sit with that truth. The truth is that we all may have some ways of acting and communicating that may need some revision. We are after all, only human. But do we need to carry on certain less-than-ideal ways of being that have been passed down from generation to generation?

I challenge myself and invite you to join me in being a better role model for our daughters (and sons!). The benefits of doing so will ripple through their lives and the lives of future generations! Here are 19 ways we can consider being a healthy role model for our daughters…

  1. Apologize when you are sorry for something you have done. – Having the ability to say “I’m sorry” is a true strength. It will teach your daughter that it’s okay to make mistakes. We all do it. And apologizing builds connection between people.
  2. Exercise regularly. – Watching you put your sneakers on every day and seeing your revived and calm after you have exercised will leave an indelible mark on her beliefs about exercise and the benefits of it.
  3. Practice conflict resolutions skills. – Some of us grew up in homes where conflictual feelings were either stuffed or explosive. The ability to talk about conflicts when all parties have calmed down is an art form worth learning. These skills will help your daughter throughout her life in all relationships.
  4. Clean up after yourself. – How can you expect her to put her things away neatly when you have clothes strewn all over your room?
  5. Bring gifts to friends and family who are sick. – Demonstrating compassion and care is simply a beautiful thing.
  6. Volunteer and help strangers in need. – The value of giving of yourself, your time, energy and money to those less fortunate than you instills a sense of connectedness and fulfillment that comes from helping others.
  7. Read. – Reading is an unending gift. Sharing your love of reading with your daughter will give her limitless worlds to explore.
  8. Call your parents if you are still lucky enough to have them. – Do you want your daughter to call you when she is older?
  9. Walk away when you want to yell. – This type of self-control benefits you and your daughter. Yelling rattles the nervous system and we don’t want to injure anyone’s nervous system.
  10. Be kind to everyone. – Show kindness in everyday interactions with family, friends and strangers. Go out of your way to helps somebody.
  11. Take care of yourself. – Show your daughter the importance of “You” time.
  12. Set good limits. – When you show her how to set limits and say no to things, she will take that out into the world and be able to set limits herself.
  13. Spend time with family and friends. – This will give your daughter a sense of community and a feeling of support that comes from being a part of a caring group of people.
  14. Be mindful of the words you speak. – I believe that we speak our world into existence, so be careful what you say. Stay away from negative talk.
  15. Keep a positive attitude. – Smile often, Laugh often. Believe in the goodness of people. Believe in limitless possibilities.
  16. Make special time for your daughter. – No matter how old your daughter is, she will always appreciate special time with you.
  17. Talk about bodies in terms of health, not size.
  18. Be an engaged listener. – When listening, stay focused and reflect back to her what she is saying and feeling. Do not try to solve her issues. Allow her the space to talk it out so she can come up with solutions.
  19. Dream big. – Continue to go after you own dreams!

[(cc) Louise Leclerc]


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nancy RothenbergNancy Rothenberg

Nancy  has been empowering girls since 1985. She teaches self-defense, martial arts and life lessons at her studio in Northampton and beyond. Nancy is also a bodyworker, blogger, love of life and most importantly, a mom. You can read her latest blog posts at nancyrothenberg.com.

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