32 Community-Based Educational Highlights: Pompeii to Blackout Poetry. Kora to Pinwheels.

Community art projects encourage intergenerational learning, self-expression, and creative free play! The 3rd Annual Hilltown Draw-Around invites people of all ages to help create a giant mandala, or add self-portraits to the community gallery. On Saturday, April 8, 12pm-12am, come get inspired by other artistic community members, and participate in workshops! There will be storytelling and live music as well during this 12-hour event. Participants will have 4,000 square feet of drawing space to work with. All proceeds support ARTeens, a pay-what-you-can after-school program of the Shelburne Falls Art Garden. All activities will take place in the Cowell Community Gym. 413-625-2782. 51 Maple Street. Shelburne Falls, MA. (FREE)

Teen History to Vernal Pools. Stringed Instruments to African Music. Scientific Process to Pinwheels. These are just a few of the community-based learning highlights we’re featuring this week!

Peruse our list below and make plans to get out into your community and learn while you play!

Featured community highlight this week:  Art is inextricably tied to culture; therefore, historic art can teach us a great deal about historic cultures. The Smith College Museum of Art is offering a Free Community Day full of learning about Ancient Rome on Saturday, April 8, 11:30am-3:30pm. Visitors can explore the exhibition, Leisure and Luxury in the Age of Nero: The Villas of Oplontis near Pompeii, enjoy a storytime, taste olive oil and explore a sensory recreation of a Roman Garden! Studying the city of Pompeii also ties into learning about geology and archaeology. At the event Smith College geoscientists will explain the science behind volcanic rocks and archaeology students will demonstrate what it’s like to excavate a site like Oplontis. All ages are welcome. Visit the Smith College Museum of Art website for more details. 413-585-2760. 20 Elm Street. Northampton, MA. (FREE)


PlacemakingAstronomyLiteracyWorld StudiesPhilosophyRomeCommunity ArtTeen ShowcaseHistoryEcologyService-Based LearningMusic StudiesParentingWorld LanguageFiber ArtsOrnithologyGuided HikePhysicsCosmologyPoetryFarming


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Astronomy

COSMOLOGY
“Cosmic inflation is a theory that was proposed in the 1980s by cosmologist Alan Guth to answer some of the most fundamental questions of the origins of our universe. It also solved the Horizon Problem and the Flatness Problem.” – Physics Girl

CONSTELLATIONS
Tuesday, April 11, 10am-2pm
Constellation viewers can help kids learn the shapes of constellations and know what to look for in the night sky. Families are invited to New England Air Museum to learn about the history of constellations and build their own constellation viewer out of paper materials. Constellations helped humans over time to learn about the movement of celestial bodies, through the discovery that what is visible in the night sky changes seasonally. This program is part of Spring Fling, two weeks of educational programming at the New England Air Museum. Check their website for full details. 860-623-330. 36 Perimeter Road. Windsor Locks, CT. (Adult $; Ages 4-11 <$; Members and ages 3 and under FREE)

ASTRONOMY PRESENTATION/RESEARCH
Wednesday, April 12, 12:15pm
What do stargazing and advanced mathematics have in common? Astronomy! Some people are satisfied to admire the beauty of the sky while others want to engage their curiosity. Discovering facts such as how far away celestial bodies are from each other requires complex mathematical equations. This interest also intersects with an interest in spacecraft and space exploration. W. Lowell Putnam, IV, sole trustee of the Lowell Observatory, will be giving a presentation on modern astronomical research, including the search for exoplanets (planets circling distant stars). The audience is invited to bring a lunch to enjoy during the program. Springfield Museums. 413-263-6800. 21 Edwards Street. Springfield, MA. (<$)

PLANETARIUM SHOW
Friday, April 14, 8pm
An interest in studying astronomy can develop from an interest in mathematical calculation, or a simple appreciation for the beauty of the sky. Planetarium shows at the Hopkins Observatory feature demonstrations of a range of phenomena including retrograde motions of the planets, phases of the moon, the varying temperatures/colors of stars, locations of neighboring galaxies, the mythological figures and zodiacal signs ascribed to constellations, and much more. They will be offering free shows on Friday evenings through running through May 12. Call 413-597-2188 for more information. Williams College. 829 Main Street. Williamstown, MA. (FREE)

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Literacy

POETRY/NATURE-BASED LEARNING
Western Massachusetts has been home to many poets and writers who were inspired by this region’s remarkable landscape. April is National Poetry Month. As nature begins to come to life in blossoms and buds, National Poetry Month is the perfect catalyst for exploring the outdoor spaces and places that inspired great writers of the past and present through some of the many local trails found in the region. Read more in our post, Learning Ahead: National Poetry Month.

BOOK FEST
Saturday, April 8, 9:30am-1:30pm
There are lots of ways parents can make reading fun and creative positive associations with reading for their children. Kid’s Book Fest will have tons of fun, literacy activities. Kids and parents are invited to engage with poetry by writing “blackout” poems and book spine poems. There will be art, science, and music activities which relate to reading. Children’s book authors Tony and Angela Diterlizzi will give a presentation and book signing so families can connect directly with authors. Help your kids become interested in reading, writing, and tons of other subjects at Kid’s Book Fest. Easthampton High School Auditorium. 70 Williston Avenue.  Check the BookFest website for a full schedule of events at various locations. Easthampton, MA. (FREE – $$)

POETRY/WORLD LANGUAGE
Sunday, April 9, 3pm
Translation, as well as the study of other cultures and languages, can have an interesting impact on one’s writing. Polina Barskova and Eugene Ostashevsky are two poets are two poets steeped in the study of more than one literary tradition. Barskova has authored eight books of poetry and one book of prose in Russian. Ostashevsky is the author of the poetry collections The Pirate Who Does Not Know the Value of Pi, Life and Opinions of DJ Spinoza, Literature, and translated Alexander Vvendsky’s An Invitation for Me to Think. Come to a reading of their works at the Jones Library and learn how Russian and English literature have impacted their poetic writing. 413-259-3090. 43 Amity Street. Amherst, MA. (FREE)

POETRY/DISCUSSION GROUP
Monday, April 10, 7pm
One of the beautiful things about poetry, and in fact all art forms, is the way in which a poem can elicit widely different reactions and associations from different readers. Poetry reading groups can enrich your experience through diverse perspectives. The Forbes Library is offering an ongoing, poetry discussion group on Mondays through May 15. On April 10, participants will discuss poems published in the New Yorker. The New Yorker is a highly reputable American magazine which has been publishing creative writing and journalism since 1925. 413-587-1011. 20 West Street. Northampton, MA. (FREE)

AUTHOR TALK
Thursday, April 13, 6:30pm
Ellen Meeropol is an author of three books: House Arrest (2011), On Hurricane Island (2015), and Kinship of Clover (2017). Her books explore such diverse topics as botany/species extinction, cults, and terrorism, while in each book also conveying complex human relationships. She will be giving a talk at the Granby Library to discuss her writing process and her work. Copies of her books are available at the library for loan. You do not need to read any in advance to attend. 413-467-3320. 297 East State Street. Granby, MA. (FREE)

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World Studies

ART STUDIES/ROMAN HISTORY
Saturday, April 8, 11:30am-3:30pm
Art is inextricably tied to culture; therefore, historic art can teach us a great deal about historic cultures. The Smith College Museum of Art is offering a Free Community Day full of learning about Ancient Rome. Visitors can explore the exhibition, Leisure and Luxury in the Age of Nero: The Villas of Oplontis near Pompeii, enjoy a storytime, taste olive oil and explore a sensory recreation of a Roman Garden! Studying the city of Pompeii also ties into learning about geology and archaeology. At the event Smith College geoscientists will explain the science behind volcanic rocks and archaeology students will demonstrate what it’s like to excavate a site like Oplontis. All ages are welcome. Visit the Smith College Museum of Art website for more details. 413-585-2760. 20 Elm Street. Northampton, MA. (FREE)

ANTHROPOLOGY /ROME
“Welcome to the world of Lucius Popidius Secundus, a 17-year old living in Rome in 73 AD. His life is a typical one of arranged marriages, coming-of-age festivals, and communal baths. Take a look at this exquisitely detailed lesson on the life of a typical Roman teenager two thousand years ago.” – TED-Ed

View full lesson:
A glimpse of teenage life in ancient Rome – Ray Laurence

ART STUDIES/ANTHROPOLOGY
Friday, April 14, 4pm-8pm
Fresco is a mural painting technique involving a plaster setting such that the painting becomes part of the wall. Art lovers of all ages are invited to view the Smith College Museum of Art exhibit Fresco Fragments and draw inspiration for hands-on art activities. Participants will be able to take home their own fresco replica embellished with vines, leaves, and flowers. There will be a guided talk at 6pm and a screening of Layers of Pompeii (2016) at 7pm. People of all ages tend to be fascinated by the story of Pompeii, a sixth century BC town destroyed, yet preserved, by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. 413-585-2760. 20 Elm Street. Northampton, MA. (FREE)

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Community Art & Performance

HILLTOWN DRAW-AROUND/INTERGENERATIONAL
Saturday, April 8, 12pm-12am
Community art projects encourage intergenerational learning, self-expression, and creative free play! The 3rd Annual Hilltown Draw-Around invites people of all ages to help create a giant mandala, or add self-portraits to the community gallery. Come get inspired by other artistic community members, and participate in workshops! There will be storytelling and live music as well during this 12-hour event. Participants will have 4,000 square feet of drawing space to work with. All proceeds support ARTeens, a pay-what-you-can after-school program of the Shelburne Falls Art Garden. All activities will take place in the Cowell Community Gym. 413-625-2782. 51 Maple Street. Shelburne Falls, MA. (FREE)

GOSHEN ROCKS/TEENS
Saturday, April 8, 5:30pm-9pm
Teen art expos bring the voices and perspectives of youth to an audience of all ages, helping teens to be included and respected within the community. Goshen Rocks Youth Arts Expo presented by People to Watch: The Next Generation will feature music, film, poetry, visual art and crafts, all created by teens! Local bands include Ursa Minor, Felixis Jinx, Luna, North Star Band, Parlicium, Raspberry Jam, and Third Dimension. There will be short films by Tobias Lamontagne, Ben Tobin, and Gus Ganley. By celebrating the voices of teens within an intergenerational, community-based context, families can offer youth of any age a powerful example of what it means to be a part of a community. Goshen Town Hall. Goshen, MA. (FREE)

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Philosophy

INDUCTION & ABDUCTION
We continue our look at philosophical reasoning by introducing two more types: induction and abduction. Hank explains their strengths and weaknesses, as well as counterarguments and the Socratic method.” – Crash Course Philosophy #3

PLACEMAKING
Saturday, April 8, 1pm-4pm
Smith College students have been helping to develop the MacLeish Field Station, an area of forest and farmland in Whately, for a variety of educational purposes. You can explore their work at “Arts Afield Launch Stroll.” This interdisciplinary learning event will feature public talks, opportunities for writing, reflection, artistic and philosophical inquiry and more. For full details and directions email rbertone@smith.edu. MacLeish Field Station. Whately, MA. (FREE)

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History

LOCAL HISTORY/WWII
Saturday, April 8, 2pm
Although World War II is usually credited with ushering women into the workforce, it was in fact World War I that first witnessed substantial numbers of women entering into wartime industries. For many women, employment at the Springfield Armory was a gateway to newfound opportunities and independence. Starting in World War I and continuing until it closed its doors in 1968, Springfield Armory hired large numbers of women to help meet wartime production requirements. “Doing Our Bit: Springfield Answers the WWI Call to Arms” will highlight the contributions of women ordinance workers to the war effort. It will focus on a wide variety of topics including wartime production, propaganda, workforce diversification, and social life. Park Ranger Krystal Vezina paints a vivid picture of the wartime employment experience through Armory newsletters, archival photographs, and other historical documents and items. Springfield Armory National Historic Site. 413-734-8551. One Armory Square. Springfield, MA. (FREE)

HISTORY/STORYTELLING
Saturday, April 8, 9:30am-4pm
According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word history comes from the Latin word “historia,” meaning “investigation, inquiry, research, account, description, written account of past events, writing of history, historical narrative, recorded knowledge of past events, story, narrative.” Historians often take primary source documents and weave them into an engaging narrative to help us remember our past and gain knowledge from it. The next Pioneer Valley Historic Network meeting will feature storytelling performances as well as presentations about storytelling. Christina Vida will discuss storytelling from a curator’s perspective; Sarah Jane Poindexter will talk about eliciting stories from oral history projects. This is a great event for storytellers, historians, curators, writers and anyone else with an interest in these topics. Hall Tavern. 80 Old Main Street. Deerfield, MA. ($; student <$)

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Ecology

VERNAL POOLS
Saturday, April 8, 10am-12pm
Are your kids studying life cycles, ecology or habitats? Have you thought about taking them to check out a vernal pool in your area? Vernal pools are a temporary type of wetland habitat, home to a number of extraordinary animals.Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary invites children ages four through twelve, and their caregivers, to explore vernal pools up close. Participants will be able to dip their nets into the water and see who is living there! Wear sneakers or water shoes. Registration is required. 413-584-3009. 127 Combs Road. Easthampton, MA. (<$)

RIVER ECOLOGY/SERVICE-BASED LEARNING
Saturday, April 8, 2:30pm-4:30pm
Adventures in or along local rivers offer the opportunity to learn about ecology. The Housatonic River is one of Western Massachusetts’ many amazing bodies of water. You can become familiar with the Housatonic river by attending a Stream Team Training, and learn how to complete river assessments. Volunteers will walk or paddle a 1 – 2 mile segment of the river and record observations. This training session at the Berkshire Athenaeum will give you all the necessary knowledge and skills to volunteer. Call the Housatonic Valley Association at 413-298-7024 to register. 1 Wendell Avenue. Pittsfield, MA. (FREE)

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Music Studies

JAZZ MUSIC
Saturday, April 8, 7pm
Jazz is a genre which lets individual musicians shine through the impressive feat of improvisation. Rather than consisting of a single catchy chorus repeated between verses throughout the song (as in most modern popular music), jazz songs tend to begin with a chorus accompanied by a melody known as the “head.” This melody can be repeated or throughout or played only once more at the end of the song. Jazz musicians tend to know a wide array of “standard” songs such that a group of jazz musicians could get together, call a tune, and play immediately. Saxophonist and composer Kris Allen and his quartet present will be offering a night of jazz standards and original compositions at the Clark Art Institute. For jazz experts and novices alike this is bound to be an enjoyable and educational performance. Allen has performed throughout the United States and worldwide as a composer, arranger, and bandleader. 413-458-2303. 225 South Street. Williamstown, MA. ($$)

STRINGED INSTRUMENTS
Sunday, April 9, 3pm
How many stringed instruments can you name? There are guitars, lutes, ukuleles, mandolins, violins, the list goes on. These instruments vary in all sorts of ways including their pitch, their size, and their tuning. Instruments in the violin family are held along one arm, or placed upright between the legs, as opposed to guitars, ukuleles, and mandolins. Even pianos are string instruments; hitting the keys causes a hammer to strike a string. An upcoming Smith College faculty recital with cellist Volcy Pelletier will feature cello, piano, and violin, all stringed instruments. Cellist Pelletier will be joined by Hiromi Fukuda on piano and Joel Pitchon on violin. They will play works by Ron Perera and Benjamin Britten. Sweeney Concert Hall, Sage Hall. 144 Green Street. Northampton, MA. (FREE)

WORLD MUSIC/CHORAL
Sunday, April 9, 3pm
Hear music from all over the world at the Amherst College Glee Club concert! The works performed have been chosen by graduating students, and include a mix of sacred and secular music. The performance will feature music from the Republic of Georgia, Japan, Ireland, and Macedonia. The concert will conclude with the traditional “Senior Song” by James S. Hamilton (Class of 1906) and the passing of the historic senior chalice. Come support these young musicians, some of whom are soon to graduate, and hear world music. Buckley Recital Hall. Arms Music Center at Amherst College. 53 College Street. Amherst, MA. (FREE)

WORLD MUSIC/AFRICAN
Tuesday, April 11, 6pm
A West African instrument, the “kora,” has 21 strings and is native to the Mande peoples who live within the countries of Gambia, Senegal, Mali, Guinea, and Guinea Bissau. It is a melodic and seemingly peaceful though traditionally, kora songs tell ancient stories of war and hardship. The kora is 300 years old but it is used to play songs up to 800 years old. You can learn more about this instrument and West African music in general by attending a concert and educational demonstration by Sean Gaskell at the Holyoke Public Library. 413-420-8101. 250 Chestnut Street. Holyoke, MA. (FREE)

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Parenting

PRESCHOOL BEHAVIOR
Sunday, April 9, 4pm-5:30pm
Preschool is a tough time for lots of kids! Aggression, noncooperation, tantrums, shyness and feeding issues are all common behavioral problem areas for preschool aged children. Northampton Area Pediatrics is offering a parenting workshop to discuss these issues and offer tips for dealing with them effectively and compassionately. Sharon Saline, Psy.D. and Jonathan Schwab, M.D. will run this workshop. Call 413-517-2226 to register. 193 Locust Street. Northampton, MA. (FREE)

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR
Tuesday, April 11, 5:30pm-7:30pm
Community Network for Children is offering a discussion series- “Families Connecting”- for parents to discuss various topics. The focus will be on families with children between 0-8 years of age. On April 11, “Positive Behavior – the whole family,” participants will explore holistic approaches to behavioral improvement. Parents are invited to join in on the discussion on April 11 and later on May 23 when the group will make a plan moving forward and decide on what topics they will be focusing on next. Childcare and dinner will be offered during the events. Call 978-544-5157 to register. Swift River School. 201 Wendell Road. New Salem, MA. (FREE)

BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT
Tuesday, April 11, 5:30pm-7:30pm
Problematic behaviors in young children often have hidden emotional meanings and explanations. Identifying the reason behind a problem behavior and examining what happens immediately before and after this behavior can help parents to curb it. The Collaborative for Educational Services parenting workshop, “Facing the Challenge,” will help parents to identify three parts of a behavior plan: preventions, new skills to teach, and new responses. Attend the workshop to receive useful tips and commiserate with other local parents. Registration is required through the Collaborative website. 413-586-4900. This session will take place at the Palmer/Monson Family Network. 4 Springfield Street. Three Rivers, MA. (FREE)

DISCUSSION GROUP
Tuesday, April 11, 6pm-7:30pm
Want to feel supported and understood as a parent? Join a parenting discussion! Parents of children ages birth through eight are invited to enjoy a cup of tea or coffee to take a break and discuss the joys and challenges of parenting. This group will have three sessions on March 28, April 4 and 11. Registration is required via the Collaborative for Educational Services website. For more information call 413-586-4900 x 5568. This session will take place at the Ware Family Center. 49 Church Street. Ware, MA. (FREE)

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World Language

BILINGUAL/SPANISH
Tuesday, April 11, 10am-11am
Early childhood is the best time to introduce languages to your child. As part of their Puzzle of Parenting series, the Collaborative for Educational Services is providing a bilingual story, music, and games session for families. Participants will engage their children with both English and Spanish, and learn about Spanish and Latin American culture. This could be a great way to connect your child to their own heritage or to introduce other cultures for a more global understanding. This program is intended for children ages birth to five years, and their caregivers. Registration is required through the Collaborative for Educational Services website. For more information, call the Collaborative at 413-586-4900. This program will take place at the Easthampton Family Center. 43 Main Street. Easthampton, MA. (FREE)

BILINGUAL/FRENCH
Tuesday, April 11, 6pm-7pm
Learning a second language is a fun and exciting challenge for the brain. Since learning a second language is easiest during early childhood, language learning can be the perfect intergenerational pursuit for parents who want to expand their knowledge. Fluency in more than one language opens up career opportunities, as well as the ability to converse easily with a greater number of people, both at home and when traveling. Fluent French speakers as well as learners are invited to a casual French conversation session, the second Tuesday of every month at the Cushman Library. 413-648-5402. 28 Church Street. Bernardston, MA. (FREE)

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FIBER ARTS

SEWING/INTERGENERATIONAL
Tuesday, April 11, 4pm-6pm
Sewing and other fiber arts are useful skills with a rich history. The ability to repair clothing, however, has fallen out of fashion. You can introduce fiber arts to your children in a “no experience necessary” atmosphere by attending the Inter-Generational Bag Sew Group at the Senior Center Cafe in Haydenville. The basic skills will be taught. There will be many ways to get involved including sewing and cutting fabric. Bring a sewing machine if you have one. Participants will sew cloth bags for the Williamsburg library, pharmacy and local food pantries in partnership with The Bag Share Project. This is also an opportunity to teach your children about recycling and reuse. The cafe is located in the town office building. For more information call the Senior Center at 413-268-8407. 141 Main Street. Haydenville, MA. (FREE)

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Ornithology

SCIENTIFIC PROCESS
“Herein we explain that birds do not hibernate in lakes, do not migrate to the moon, but DO go on very unique journeys, which we humans have learned about in a variety of ingenious manners.” – MinuteEarth

GUIDED HIKE/PIONEER VALLEY
Saturday, April 8, 7am-10am
You can bird watch year-round, but spring and fall are the best times to learn about migrating birds. Adults are invited on an an easy two mile loop around Graves Farm Wildlife Sanctuary to look for migratory birds such as blackburnian warblers, hermit thrushes, and tree swallows. Bring binoculars and a field guide if you have one. Long pants and close-toed shoes suggested for better tick protection. For further learning at home, check out Mass Audubon’s resource, Flyways of the Americas, to learn about the pathway of four birds that travel each spring and fall. Registration is required. 413-584-3009. Adams Road. Haydenville, MA. (Members <$; Non members $)

GUIDED HIKE/BERKSHIRES
Wednesday, April 12, 8am-10am
Spring is in the air…and so are migratory birds! Beginner and expert bird watchers alike are invited to Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary to look for species of wood warblers, orioles, thrushes, and more, who make their temporary homes here in the warm months. Participants will walk through wetlands, meadows, and woodlands. During this weekly event participants will see how the ecology changes and different birds arrive over time. Please bring binoculars. This program is for adults and will be instructed by Pleasant Valley’s caretaker. 413-637-0320. 472 West Mountain Road. Lenox, MA. (FREE)

BIRD WATCHING
Friday, April 14, 8am-10am
Spring is in the air…and so are migratory birds! Beginner and expert bird watchers alike are invited to Canoe Meadows Wildlife Sanctuary to look for species of wood warblers, orioles, thrushes, and more, who make their temporary homes here in the warm months. Participants will walk through wetlands, meadows, and woodlands. During this weekly event participants will see how the ecology changes and different birds arrive over time. Please bring binoculars. This program is for adults and will be instructed by Noreen Mole – Sanctuary Volunteer and Hoffmann Bird Club leader. 413-637-0320. Holmes Road. Pittsfield, MA. (FREE)

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STEM

PHYSICS
Wednesday, April 12, 10am-2pm
Pinwheels, propellers, wind turbines, windmills- they all have a similar shape. Why? Symmetry is the scientific secret behind the movement of wind-powered tools and toys. Kids with an interest in physics and hands-on activities should come to the pinwheel make and take at New England Air Museum to learn more! This program is part of Spring Fling, two weeks of educational programming at the New England Air Museum. Check their website for full details. 860-623-330. 36 Perimeter Road. Windsor Locks, CT. (Adult $; Ages 4-11 <$; Members and ages 3 and under FREE)

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Farming

AGROBIOLOGY/PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE
Thursday, April 13, 6:30pm
Agrobiology is a branch of biology which explores soil science and plant nutrition as it relates to crop production. Ed Stockman is an agrobiologist and a 4th generation farmer. He will be sharing his knowledge with visitors of the Meekins Library with his talk “The High Cost of Cheap Food: Pesticide Residues.” The quality of food has significantly decreased over the past two decades. He will explain why and provide a farmer and scientist’s perspective. 413-268-7472. 2 Williams Street. Williamsburg, MA. (FREE)

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[Photo credit: (cc) latteda]


Learn Local. Play Local. is supported in part by a grant from the Belchertown, Buckland, Chicopee, Colrain, Cummington, Gill, Hadley, New Salem, Plainfield, Shelburne, Westhampton, and Worthington Cultural Councils, local agencies which are supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency.

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