Suggested Events for 20th – 26th, 2018

Hilltown Families List of Weekly Suggested Events

To find out about more event, be sure to visit our Suggest an Event Bulletin Board to see what our readers have recently shared! Have an event to share? Feel encouraged to self-post community events here at any time!

Suggest EventIf you have a community event, educational program, or service-learning opportunity happening in Western Massachusetts that you’d like to let us know about, self-post your event at any time on our Suggest An Event bulletin board. The events below are “suggested.” Please take the time to confirm that these events are happening, along with time, place, age appropriateness, and costs before attending.

Enhanced PublicityServing Western Massachusetts since 2005, Hilltown Families supports development and enhancement of our local economy and community. Local businesses, individuals, schools, and non-profits are encouraged to partner with Hilltown Families through sponsorship and advertising. Let us help get the word out about your after school/homeschool class, event, camp, workshop, fundraiser, business/school, service, open house, volunteer opportunity or general announcement. Deliver your message to thousands of families living throughout the four counties of Western MA while supporting the community development work of Hilltown Families! Click HERE to find out more.

After-School Classes & Enrichment Programs

Reach thousands of families in the region with our 2018-2019 directory! Reserve your space.

Our community is rich in learning opportunities to supplement the interests of children, teens, and life-long learners. We have put together a directory of after-school & weekend classes and enrichment programs happening across Western Massachusetts throughout the school year. Many of these programs aren’t just for kids, so to all the adults out there – feel encouraged to pursue your interests and honor your callings through these enrichment classes, too!

If you have a class or program you would like to have included in our directory, contact us at sales@hilltownfamilies.org to learn about our advertising options and sponsorship packages.

Bulletin Board

Oct 20

Take part in the 47th Annual Fall Foliage Celebration and 5K Walk/Run on Saturday, October 20th , 9:30am – 1pm on the Amherst Town Common. This will be a family event with lots of great entertainment including FREE face painting, hayrides, dancing and drumming, local hip hop and more. The 5K includes beautiful vistas during peak foliage! The Amherst A Better Chance program has been in Amherst for nearly 50 years and has changed the lives of over 125 high schoolers. The community has played a critical role in making this program happen, so please sign up today. Click here to register: www.amherstabetterchance.org.

Oct 20 & Nov 17

Saturdoozy!! An Art Themed Kids Night Out in Noho! October 20th and November 17th. Fun, safe, and supervised, SATURDOOZY, welcomes children ages 7 and up, and will feature a DJ, dancing, games, ping-pong, arts and crafts, karaoke, face-painting, pizza, snacks and a movie to top the night! An added plus, parents can also opt for a “VALET SERVICE” – supervised curbside pick-up, so you don’t have to worry about parking! Admission is $30 (6PM – 10 PM) or $20 (6PM – 8PM), additional siblings half price. Pre-registration highly recommended at studio4noho.com or at 413-570-4491.

Oct 21

Celebrate the Valley’s farms, food, and friends with Kestrel Land Trust’s special 10th Annual 5K for Farmland & Farmers’ Market Festival! Sunday, October 21, 11 a.m. – 2 pm on the West St. Common, Hadley. Family-friendly 5K race on a flat route through scenic farmland or a beautiful 2-mile riverside walk. Farmers’ Market Festival after the race with music by “The Empty Bottle Ramblers,” local food, products and crafts, plus a live Birds of Prey demo with Tom Ricardi. Henry the Juggler will be there, courtesy of Hadley Cultural Council. For the adults, free local beer by Valley Malt for registered participants age 21+. Get a special edition pint glass and be entered into a drawing for great prizes when you register at 5kforfarmland.org.

Add your class

Reach thousands of families in the region with our 2018-2019 directory! Reserve your space. Our community is rich in after-school learning opportunities to supplement the interests of our children, teens, and life-long learners. We are putting together a directory of after-school & weekend classes and enrichment programs happening across Western Massachusetts to be published on our web site later this month and featured throughout the school year. If you have a class or program you would like to have included in our directory, contact us at sales@hilltownfamilies.org to learn about our advertising options and sponsorship packages.

Add your school

Hilltown Families Preschool Directory: Are you looking for a preschool that fits your child’s personality and reflects your family’s values? Check out our growing Preschool Directory, covering all four counties in Western Massachusetts, and find the perfect place for your young one! — Have a school you’d like to include in this list? Click here to find out how to have it added.

ADVERTISE HERE: Reach thousands of families in Western MA while supporting the community development work of Hilltown Families! See your summer camp, class, community event, school, open house, audition, homeschool program, workshop, volunteer opportunity, wellness program, local business, after-school class, or non-profit featured here in the Bulletin Board section of our list of Weekly Suggested Events and in our weekly eNewsletter, reaching thousands of families living throughout the four counties of Western MA while supporting the community development work of Hilltown Families! Find out more about our advertising options and how you can partner with Hilltown Families in your online marketing by emailing us at at sales@hilltownfamilies.org.

Become a Contributing WriterJOIN OUR TEAM OF CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Interested in becoming a Contributing or Guest Writer for Hilltown Families? We welcome writings that reflect the community-building and educational efforts parents, teens, teachers, artists, activists and community leaders work towards and accomplish, and how that affects, supports and empowers our families. All writing styles welcomed, including local reviews, DIY posts, seasonal cooking/local food, and community-based educational & community service learning opportunities/resources. Send your query to info@hilltownfamilies.org.


LIST OF WEEKLY SUGGESTED EVENTS
October 20th – 26th, 2018

SaturdaySunday
MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday

 

Suggest an Event | Cultural Itineraries | Forecast | Museum Passes | Weekly eNewsletter | Farmers’ Markets | Storyhour & Playgroups| Berkshire Family Fun | Advertise/Sponsorship | en Español

Donate Now Events Happening in the Hilltowns

Saturday, October 20th, 2018

advertise with Hilltown Families

Click HERE to discover classes. Click HERE to find out about other community events. Click HERE to leave a comment about upcoming events.

Hilltown Family Variety Show9-10am – HILLTOWN FAMILY VARIETY SHOW: Tune in on your FM dial, or listen live via streaming audio at www.valleyfreeradio.org. Autumn means harvest time in the northeastern United States. But what are people harvesting in other parts of the country, and around the world? Join Guest DJ Story Laurie for some lively songs (including two that were written by elementary school kids!); a crazy tale about a girl sailing around the world on a cabbage; and we’ll even check in with some folks in the Philippines, Finland, and Korea about what they’re harvesting right now. Encore of Saturday’s broadcast airs Sunday morning from 7-8am and podcast is posted here on Hilltown Families immediately following Sunday’s broadcast. Listen to the Hilltown Family Variety Show podcasts anytime. Click here select from over 10 years of archived shows!

Saturday, October 20, 10-11:30am
NATURE STUDIES/BEARS
Bears play an important role in the folklore of many human communities. Among the Inuit, bears are considered almost human and shown a great deal of reverence for their power and intelligence. When a bear was killed, its spirit was offered weapons and tools, to take to be used in the other world. Katmai National Park in Alaska is one of the best places in the world to see these amazing creatures in action. Every summer, hundreds of thousands of salmon swim upstream, drawing large numbers of bears. This Saturday, Stacey Schmeidel will discuss her experience as a park ranger at Katmai during this past summer, including life at camp and the amazing bears she was able to interact with. Forbes Library. Northampton, MA (FREE)

Saturday, October 20, 12-4pm
AGRICULTURE/FESTIVAL
Agrarian philosopher Wendell Berry writes: “We have lived our lives by the assumption that what was good for us would be good for the world. We have been wrong. We must change our lives so that it will be possible to live by the contrary assumption, that what is good for the world will be good for us. And that requires that we make the effort to know the world and learn what is good for it.” It takes very little to recognize that industrial life is not good for anyone but ourselves, and even that may be debated. Nowhere is this more clear than in the case of industrialized agriculture. Just this past summer, agrochemical giant Monsanto was forced to pay almost 300 million dollars in a lawsuit, which demonstrated that the company’s herbicides cause cancer. The company is currently facing over 8,000 lawsuits. Supporting local organic agriculture is good for the world, and it is good for humanity. Come celebrate local agriculture at the Hampshire College Farm Fall Festival, with an afternoon of food, music, and fun! Hampshire College Farm and CSA. 793 West Street, Amherst, MA (FREE)

Saturday, October 20, 12-5pm
HARVEST FESTIVAL
The celebration of the fall harvest has been one of the most important cultural occasions in communities all over the world. Particularly in the Northern Hemisphere, the fall harvest was doubly significant because it supplied the necessary rations for surviving the long cold winters. The folkloric figure of the Corn Mother demonstrates the incredible cultural significance of the fall harvest in Northern Europe. Made from the last sheaf of wheat to be harvested in the autumn, the Corn Mother, or Corn Maiden sits inside the house all winter long and is then ploughed into the first furrow the following spring. This custom reminded traditional people of the cycles of life and death, decay and restoration. As the family protected the Corn Mother throughout the winter, so too would She protect the community with a bountiful harvest in the following season. This Saturday, Simple Gifts Farm will be hosting the North Amherst Harvest Festival, a celebration of the bounty and blessings of the earth and harvest. Fun for kids, festive hayrides, and a pig roast! Simple Gifts Farm. 1089 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA (FREE)

Saturday, October 20, 1-2:30pm
PHOTOGRAPHY/CIVIL RIGHTS
 Local resident Jim Lemkin was a volunteer photographer with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in Mississippi in 1965, documenting the illegal suppression of African American voters. In a politically tense environment, SNCC volunteers went door to door, informing African American residents about how to register to vote. Lemkin will be presenting a slideshow of images from his trip and discussing the ongoing attempts to erode voter rights. Meekins Library. 2 Williams Street, Williamsburg, MA (FREE)

Saturday, October 20, 1-4pm
HEALTH AND WELLNESS/MARTIAL ARTS
Designed as a way to protect daoist monks from harassment and to increase longevity, Tai Chi originated as both a martial arts system and a form of moving meditation. Often in the contemporary West, the martial elements of Tai Chi are overlooked, which leads to an incomplete understanding of this multifaceted practice. As a self-defense system, Tai Chi allows the practitioner to respond to fluid situations from a place of centeredness, relaxation, and flexibility. Tai Chi promotes a way of responding to any form of conflict without strain and resistance. This free training will focus on three different elements of Tai Chi practice: meditation, movement, and self-defense. 1 Shallowbrook Lane, Northampton, MA (FREE)

Saturday, October 20, 6-7:30pm
HISTORY/OCCULT
Spiritualism, the belief that the spirits of the dead continue to exist and can communicate with the living, was a unique religious movement, which reached its peak in the mid-to-late nineteenth century, when it claimed more than eight million followers in the United States and parts of Europe. In the United States, spiritualism was closely associated with the causes of women’s rights and the abolition of slavery. This was especially true among the Quaker communities. To this day, there are many denominational spiritualist churches in the United States and elsewhere. Come learn all about the link between spiritualism and the Quakers at this spooky evening of ghost stories! Hancock Shaker Village. 1843 West Housatonic Street, Pittsfield, MA ($$)

• Return to Top


Sunday, October 21st, 2018

advertise with Hilltown Families

Click HERE to discover classes. Click HERE to find out about other community events. Click HERE to leave a comment about upcoming events.

Hilltown Family Variety Show7-8am – FAMILY RADIO: Valley Free Radio (WXOJ-LP 103.3FM Northampton, MA) airs encores of the Hilltown Family Variety Show every Sunday morning. commercial-free family radio. Tune in on your FM dial, or listen live via streaming audio at www.valleyfreeradio.org. Listen to the Hilltown Family Variety Show podcast anytime – click here to select from over 10 years of archived shows!

Sunday, October 21, 10am-12pm
HEALTH AND WELLNESS/MEDITATION
 The 3rd century BCE daoist sage Zhuangzi wrote the earliest recorded description of meditation, known in Chinese as zuowang, literally ‘sitting forgetting.’ Zhuangzi writes in the form of a dialogue between the philosopher Confucius and his pupil Yan Hui. One day Yan Hui comes to Confucius and reports that he is making progress. Confucius asks for clarification and Yan Hui responds that he has forgotten the important religious and civic rites that accompany everyday life, as well as music, two important virtues of Confucian philosophy. Confucius remarks that this is well, but hardly sufficient for attaining true wisdom. Later Yan Hui returns to say that he has forgotten the principles of benevolence and altruism. Once again, Confucius is impressed and encourages Yan Hui to continue to make progress. Finally Yan Hui comes to his teacher and says that he has forgotten everything: “I slough off my limbs and trunk,” said Yen Hui, “dim my intelligence, depart from my form, leave knowledge behind, and become identical with the Transformational Thoroughfare. This is what I mean by ‘sit and forget’.” To this Confucius responds that Yan Hui has surpassed him in wisdom and he requests to become his student. What is conveyed in this simple dialogue is the sense that our minds, our thoughts, and emotions in their separateness keep us from grasping our true essence. Even our highest morals and principles can ultimately be nothing more than the admittedly partial articulations of human language and thought. In other words, the more we can detach ourselves from our preconceived notions of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ and even our own selves, the more we can join with the peace and fluidity of the universe. The more we are able to forget, the closer we are to peace and oneness with the world. Meditation is an important feature of countless spiritual traditions from around the world. While there is variety, the central point remains the same: by quieting the mind, one can achieve great peace. Every sSnday, community members are welcome to practice an hour of meditation, followed by discussion. Shelburne Falls Shambhala Center. 71 Ashfield Street, Shelburne Falls, MA (FREE)

Sunday, October 21, 10am-4pm
LITERARY STUDIES/LANGUAGE ARTS
The incredibly rich tradition of Yiddish literature was in danger of vanishing without a trace in the 1980s, when Yiddish Book Center founder and president Aaron Lansky first began to collect books written in Yiddish. Lanksy realized that the younger generations of European Jewish families couldn’t read the language anymore and were just getting rid of them. So Lansky organized a program to salvage as many Yiddish books as he possibly could. At the time, scholars estimated there were no more than 70,000 extant Yiddish books. To date, the Yiddish Book Center has collected more than one million volumes. The Yiddish Book Center is a true cultural treasure and this Sunday is the perfect opportunity to explore, with a community open house event, featuring tours, lectures, concerts, and much more! For a complete list of open house events, please visit Community Open House. Yiddish Book Center. 1021 West Street, Amherst, MA (FREE)

Sunday, October 21, 3-5pm
DANCE/INTERGENERATIONAL
As the supreme 18th century French wit Voltaire once observed: “Let us read, and let us dance; these two amusements will never do any harm to the world.” Indeed, how many of our other pleasures may truly be said to be harmless? Dance is a universal form of culture that has an amazing ability to bring people and communities together. Through movement, the body is able to express its own intelligence, speaking in a language that we have long since forgotten. Amherst Family Dance is beginning its fourth season of bringing together people of all ages to experience the joy of dance together! Potluck snacks. The Common School. 521 South Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA (SUGGESTED DONATION)

• Return to Top


Monday, October 22nd, 2018

advertise with Hilltown Families

Click HERE to discover classes. Click HERE to find out about other community events. Click HERE to leave a comment about upcoming events.

Storyhour & Playgroups: East Longmeadow, Pelham & Whately

Monday, October 22, 9:30am-5pm
STEAM/SELF DIRECTED LEARNING
This Monday, Berkshire Museum is kicking off Berkshire STEM week with a day of engaging, hands on science activities for homeschooling families. Check out real bones and pelts from native mammals, check out the touching tide pool, build imaginative structures with Legos, and write a creative story based on a work of art. These exciting and fun activities will allow children to explore ideas in science, math, engineering, art, and math. Berkshire Museum. 39 South Street, Pittsfield, MA (FREE W/MUSEUM ADMISSION)

Monday, October 22, 10am-1pm
EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT/STORYTIME
It is hard to overstate the importance of reading out loud to a child. In addition to the obvious benefits in terms of literacy and love of reading, this practice can radically improve the behavior of child in terms of aggression and hyperactivity. New research shows that reading out loud to your child has profound social and emotional benefits. These effects are long lasting and the more parents read to their children, the stronger the benefits become. Twice a week at the Berkshire Athenaeum, families can enjoy story time for infants up the age of two. Berkshire Athenaeum. 1 Wendell Ave, Pittsfield, MA (FREE)

Monday, October 22, 6-7pm
STEM/BIOLOGY
Can slime mold help save humanity? Hampshire College professor Megan Dobro believes the answer is yes! Recently Hampshire College became the first academic institution to offer an “academic program for non-human species,” by inviting plasmodial slime mode to serve as a scholar in residence. While this may seem like a strange concept at first, it is supported by the scientific community, which is currently doing everything it can to study these fascinating organisms. What makes slime mold so unique is the fact that it is comprised of countless individual organisms that work collectively for the benefit of the whole. As the human world becomes increasingly interconnected and global, it is not merely a metaphor to say that we can learn a lot from this superorganism. The problem humanity faces today is the most severe that a species can face: causing its own extinction. It is becoming clear to many scientists that the solution is to turn our attention towards non human species to understand how we may better function as part of the ecosystem. The climate crisis has clearly demonstrated that humanity does not know best and that it’s time to let nature take over again. Professor Dobro will be discussing her research and the slime mold project at this meeting of the SciTech Cafe. You won’t want to miss this presentation from one of the most innovative thinkers in her field! Union Station. 125 Pleasant Street, Northampton, MA (FREE)

• Return to Top


Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018

advertise with Hilltown Families

Click HERE to discover classes. Click HERE to find out about other community events. Click HERE to leave a comment about upcoming events.

Storyhour & Playgroups: Agawam, Amherst, Belchertown, Cheshire, Easthampton, Florence, Gill, Great Barrington, Greenfield, Hatfiled, Huntington, Lanesborough, Lee, Ludlow, New Salem, North Adams, Sheffield, Sunderland, Turners Falls, Ware & West Springfield.

Tuesday, October 23, 11:30am-1pm
HISTORY/ASIAN STUDIES
The post war environment in Japan was extremely chaotic. It was the first time that Japan had ever been occupied by a foreign power and massive cultural changes occurred almost overnight. After massive air raids, Japan’s cities were in ruins leaving millions displaced and in the two years following the war, more than six million Japanese returned from overseas. These factors, combined with bad harvest, created enormous food shortages and an overall cultural sense of despair. While the Japanese people suffered under American occupation, the phrase “shikata na gai,” or “nothing can be done about it,” became a common sentiment. Professor Emer O’Dwyer will be discussing democracy in Occupied Japan in this talk, entitled “Ostracism, Boss Rule, and the Impossibility of Democracy in Rural Japan, 1948-58”. This is a great opportunity to learn about an important moment in modern Asian history. Campus Center 205. Northampton, MA (FREE)

• Return to Top


Wednesday, October 24th, 2018

advertise with Hilltown Families

Click HERE to discover classes. Click HERE to find out about other community events. Click HERE to leave a comment about upcoming events.

Storyhour & Playgroups: Amherst, Athol, Becket, Belchertown, Bernardston, Cummington, Deerfield, East Longmeadow, Erving, Granby, Greenfield, Huntington, Leverett, Monson, New Marlborough, North Adams, Northampton, Sheffield, Shelburne Falls, South Deerfield, Springfield, Turners Falls, Wendell, West Springfield, and Williamsburg.

Wednesday, October 24, 3:30pm
COOKING/WORKSHOP
In ages past, children would learn to cook by watching and helping their parents. Tragically more and more Americans are not cooking and children are not growing up learning these vital, time honored skills. Recent studies show that 27 percent of Americans do not cook every day and that 90 percent of Americans do not enjoy cooking. Not only does cooking help you save money and become more self sufficient, it is a deeply meditative, creative practice, which allows you create delicious dishes and puts you in touch with ancient cultural traditions. Cooking is not difficult and it’s amazing how much you can do in the kitchen, with just a little confidence. Children ages 8-12 will have the opportunity to learn some basic kitchen skills and work with delicious local produce at Abundance Farm’s Cooking with Confidence class! Abundance Farm. 257 Prospect Street, Northampton, MA ($)

Wednesday, October 24, 4:30-6:30pm
LITERARY STUDIES/LOCAL HISTORY
“I’m nobody! Who are you? / Are you nobody, too? / Then there’s a pair of us—don’t tell! / They’d banish us, you know. / How dreary to be somebody! / How public, like a frog / To tell your name the livelong day / To an admiring bog!” By the time Emily Dickinson reached the age of 30, she rarely left her house. Becoming increasingly reclusive and secluded, she nevertheless embarked on her most productive period as a poet. Writing more than 1,800 poems in her short life, it is only by chance that her poems survived at all. While her sister Lavinia promised to burn all of Emily’s poems, after the poet’s death, Lavinia thankfully found herself unable to complete her sister’s request. Lavinia contacted Emily’s friend Mabel Loomis Todd, whom she had never met in person but maintained a length correspondance with, and Todd took on the onerous task of editing Dickinson’s often indecipherable manuscripts. Ultimately it is only due to Mabel’s tireless work, and the work of her daughter Millicent, that Dickinson’s work was ever published. Author Julie Dobrow’s new biography of Mabel and Millicent draws from extensive research in the Todd family archives and paints a complex and rich portrait of two women who, in many ways, created the legacy of America’s greatest female poet. The Center for Humanistic Inquiry at Amherst College. 61 Quadrangle Drive, Amherst, MA (FREE)

Wednesday, October 24, 5:30-7:30pm
STEM/ENGINEERING
Throughout history, thinkers have used math and science to understand the phenomena they perceive in the world around them. The ancient Greek philosopher Archimedes is a great example of this. When his king was given a golden crown, which he suspected had been mixed with silver, Archimedes was tasked with devising a method to prove that a forgery had occurred. After many failed attempts, Archimedes finally solved the problem while taking a bath. Observing how the water was displaced when he got in the bath, Archimedes realized that being less dense, a crown mixed with silver would displace less water. According to legend, Archimedes was so thrilled that he leaped up naked from the bath and ran down the street shouting “eureka,” “I have found it!” In honor of STEM week in the Berkshires, the Hancock Shaker Village is inviting children grades K-5 and their families to enjoy an evening of fun and challenging STEM activities. Hancock Shaker Village. 1843 West Housatonic Street, Pittsfield, MA (FREE)

Wednesday, October 24, 6:30-8pm
FERMENTATION/NUTRITIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Like most things, sauerkraut originally came from ancient China. While the Chinese preservation technique was derived from the use of rice wine, Tatars were the first to use salt. It is thought that the dish first came to Europe with the Mongols in the 13th century. During the first World War, American sauerkraut manufacturers worried that consumers wouldn’t want to buy the product that had a German name so they relabeled it “Liberty Cabbage,” evoking the absurd “Freedom Fries” debacle of the early 2000s. Fermentation is a great way to preserve food and add beneficial bacteria to promote increased gut health. More and more medical professionals are acknowledging the link between gut bacteria and a host of ailments and fermented foods are a great way to cultivate a healthy gut microbiome. Come learn all about fermentation and its role in human health and local food economies at this special workshop, featuring some local fermented food producers. River Valley Co-op. 330 North King Street, Northampton, MA (FREE)

• Return to Top


Thursday, October 25th, 2018

advertise with Hilltown Families

Click HERE to discover classes. Click HERE to find out about other community events. Click HERE to leave a comment about upcoming events.

Storyhour & Playgroups: Agawam, Amherst, Athol, Belchertown, East Longmeadow, Florence, Gill, Greenfield, Hatfield, Huntington, Lee, Lenox, Millers Falls, Montague, Northampton, Sheffield, South Hadley, and Turners Falls.

Thursday, October 25, 3-4pm
ARTS AND CRAFTS/FASHION
Feeling inspired to create your own Halloween costume this year? Making your own costume is fun and easy. There are so many inherent learning opportunities in arts and crafts. Aside from geometry and arithmetic, making your own costume is a great way to learn how to be self sufficient and creative. If you can imagine it, you can make it! Bring a picture or design of something you’d like to make to this Maker Lab: Costume Props. Materials provided! Hatfield Public Library. 39 Main Street, Hatfield, MA (FREE)

Thursday, October 25, 5:30-8pm
TEXTILE ARTS/ARTS AND CRAFTS
Attention all crafters! Do you have a crochet project that you are stuck on? Don’t toss it out, come to the Crochet Drop In at WEBS! This is not a beginners crochet class but rather a first-come, first-served support session. Bring your yarn, pattern, and questions, and discuss solutions with WEBS crochet experts. Crochet is a great way to become more self sufficient and reconnect with traditional crafts and skills. Make a warm winter hat or a cozy scarf! WEBS. 75 Service Center Road, Northampton, MA (FREE)

Thursday, October 25, 5:30pm
TRIVIA BEE
Did you know that Joshua Abraham Norton, a homeless, failed businessman, declared himself to be Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico in San Francisco in 1859? Emperor Norton I marched through the streets of San Francisco wearing his imperial regalia, which included a hat made out of a beaver, inspecting the city’s infrastructure and making disparaging comments on the appearance of local police officers. He also printed and circulated his own currency, which was accepted at select businesses. Frustrated by the corruption and incompetence of the US government, the Emperor abolished the congress and ordered the US military to disperse it by force. These orders were not followed. He likewise issued pronouncements abolishing both the Democratic and Republican parties and forbidding any kind of conflict between different religions. Perhaps most notably, the Emperor called for the creation of an international governing body, predating the establishment of the League of Nations by some sixty years. Norton was absolutely beloved by the people of San Francisco. When he was arrested for vagrancy, the police were forced to release him following massive public outcry. And when the Emperor was laid to rest in 1880, a public fund was established to pay for his funeral, despite the fact that he had no more than a few dollars to his name. More than 10,000 people attended his funeral. If you love obscure bits of information, you won’t want to miss the 24th Annual Trivia Bee! Watch teams battle it out and test your knowledge in the audience round. Donations benefit the Amherst Education Foundation. Amherst Regional Middle School. Amherst, MA (FUNDRAISER)

Thursday, October 25, 7-8pm
LITERARY STUDIES/LOCAL HISTORY
Emily Dickinson once wrote: “Existence has overpowered books. Today I slew a mushroom.” Certainly regarded as an eccentric during her lifetime, Dickinson’s reclusive personal life continues to influence our perceptions of her as someone with mental health issues, agoraphobia, as many have suggested. This combined with the fact that she often wrote about death contributes to the popular image of Dickinson as a tragic figure. What this reading overlooks, however, is the fact that Dickinson’s seclusion was a matter of preference, rather than compulsion. As feminist poet Adrienne Rich observes: “[she] chose her seclusion, knowing she was exceptional and knowing what she needed. … She carefully selected her society and controlled the disposal of her time … neither eccentric nor quaint; she was determined to survive, to use her powers, to practice necessary economics.” Rich’s characterization seems particularly accurate when we consider how often Dickinson writes of her internal world as a site for exploration. For Dickinson, the mind and soul were thought of as physical places, inner landscapes, which she inhabited. This intense focus on the internal life of the poet has meant that much of Dickinson’s poem is written in a private language, both in terms of references to particular people from her life and in terms of her own unique poetic voice. Join Greg Mattingly for a discussion of the ‘private’ elements in Dickinson’s poetry, as he reads from his new book Emily Dickinson as a Second Language: Demystifying the Poetry. Amherst Books. 8 Main Street, Amherst, MA (FREE)

Thursday, October 25, 7:30-10:30pm
THEATER/HISTORY
The fall of the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty in China led to the subsequent creation of the Great Ming Empire, which ruled from 1368 to 1644. During this time, the population of China grew from 60 million to more than 160 million, the Great Wall was completed, arts and literature flourished, and the standing army of the empire exceeded one million. A time of massive change in China, the first Ming emperor sought to transform a society made up of self-sufficient rural communities into a massive centralized bureaucracy. Enjoy an evening of martial arts and acrobatics, with the Chinese Warriors of Peking, a live stage show set during the Ming dynasty. UMass Fine Arts Center. 151 Presidents Drive, Amherst, MA ($$)

• Return to Top


Friday, October 26th, 2018

advertise with Hilltown Families

Click HERE to discover classes. Click HERE to find out about other community events. Click HERE to leave a comment about upcoming events.

Storyhour & Playgroups: Amherst, Belchertown, Cummington, East Longmeadow, Easthampton, Florence, Granby, Great Barrington, Greenfield, Hadley, Housatonic, Longmeadow, Monson, Northampton, Pelham, Shutesbury, South Hadley, Stockbridge, and Sunderland.

Friday, October 26, 7-7:30pm
HALLOWEEN PARADE
Everyone loves a parade! Come on out this Friday for the annual Pittsfield Halloween Parade. Celebrate the spookiest time of the year and the Pittsfield community, with local schools and community groups participating. These are the types of events that bring us together and create shared traditions, which contribute to our sense of place. For more information, please visit Pittsfield Halloween Parade. Tyler Street, Pittsfield, MA (FREE)

• Return to Top


Hilltown Families’ list of Suggested Events is supported in part by grants from the Belchertown, Buckland, Chicopee, Hadley, Plainfield, Shelburne, Westhampton, and Worthington Cultural Councils, local agencies which are supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: