100+ Suggested Events in Western MA: August 31-September 13, 2019

Awarded the “Essential Agent of Change Award” by the MDPH’s Massachusetts Essentials for Childhood, Hilltown Families is recognized as a leading family strengthening initiative in the region, promoting “positive parenting through the social norm of community social connectedness.” Serving Western Massachusetts since 2005, Hilltown Families continues to support the development and enhancement of our local economy and community. Local businesses, farms, individuals, schools, and non-profit organizations are invited to collaborate with Hilltown Families in their community outreach. With 9,000 opt-in subscribers and 2.5+ million visits to our web site alone, Hilltown Families can deliver your message to thousands of families living throughout the four counties of Western MA! Find out about our affordable advertising options and how you can partner with Hilltown Families in your online marketing by contacting us at info@hilltownfamilies.org… and scroll down to discover community-based educational events and community building opportunities happening this weekend and next week in Western MA!

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Bulletin Board

Fall Sales

Shop local and smart! Stock up and save at River Valley Co-op this Fall at their three sale events. Get huge deals on full case discounts and more. August 21-September 3, Back to School Sale: Everything you need for back-to-school for you or your little ones. September 4 -17, Stock Up & Save with Co-Op Basics: 10% off over 300 everyday items and savings on cases. September 18-October 1, Squirrel Away Savings: Great deals on items perfect for the pantry or freezer. Stock up and enjoy them for months to come! For information on these amazing sales and more, visit River Valley Co-op online at www.rivervalley.coop or call 413-584-2665. Or better yet, stop by! Open from 8am-10pm. River Valley Co-op is located at 330 North King St. in Northampton.

Open House: Sep 4

Join Pioneer Valley Ballet for its 2019-2020 Season. PVB offers 11-week pre-professional ballet training sessions in the fall, winter, and spring, plus community dance classes for toddlers, children, teens, and adults. FALL KICKOFF: Fall Session begins September 9. Get to know PVB at its Open House on September 4. Then get excited for The Nutcracker at the “In a Nutshell” party on September 7. Join the cast: Nutcracker Community Auditions (ages 5-10) will also be held September 7, for performances December 13-15. No dance experience necessary. Pioneer Valley Ballet is located in the Eastworks Building at 116 Pleasant Street in Easthampton, MA. Visit them online to explore classes and events and to register. 413-527-6363 ♦ www.pioneervalleyballet.org

Start – ing Sep 17

Nerissa Nields Local Chorus. Northampton, MA ♦ Nerissa Nields runs a Local Chorus for ages 5-13, a performance group in 3-part harmony. Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 4-4:45pm at The Montessori School of Northampton starting September 17, 2019, and running for 15 weeks through MLK day (no meetings on school holidays). Cost: $225. For older kids who want a challenge, Nerissa offers Focus Chorus, a four-part harmony group for ages 11-16. Meetings are Tuesday evenings from 7:15-8:15pm in Little Blue Studio in Northampton. Cost is $265 for 15 weeks, starting September 17, 2019. nerissanields.com

Miss Leticia Music School. Amherst, MA Ukulele, Guitar, Bass, Drums, a Capella, and Voice lessons, all in one location for all ages. Beginning Groups include Beginning Ukulele I & II, Beginning Guitar, Beginning Rock Band, and Girls Rock Band. Intermediate/Advanced Groups include Ukulele, Guitar/Ukulele, Intermediate Boys Rock, Adv Girls Rock Band. Adult classes include Beginning & Intermediate Guitar, Beginning & Intermediate Ukulele, and Rock Band. Many more private and group lessons available. Teachers include Leticia Davies (Guitar/Ukulele, Voice); Rusty Daniels (Rock Guitar, Bass, Drums); Gruff Davies (Rock Band); Rhys Davies (Rock Band). After school, evening, and weekend classes. For complete schedule & to register: www.missleticia.commissleticiamusic@gmail.com

Celtic Heels & Devine Dance in Greenfield, MA. Celtic Heels offers more than just a dance class. Their goal is to foster a love of both dance and life. They offer empowerment, optimism, and confidence in their growing dancers. They are a performance school with a focus on teamwork where each student is allowed to progress at their own comfort level while being challenged along the way. Their class offerings in Irish Dance, Ballet, and Tap set a solid foundation for rhythm, balance, extension, and strength that can be applicable in many other activities. Classes offered on Tuesdays & Thursdays in Greenfield. Information and registration: 413-475-3353; celticheels@gmail.com; www.CelticHeelsDance.com.

The School for Contemporary Dance and Thought Youth Dance Program in Northampton is an all-inclusive movement program designed to ignite creativity, curiosity, and individuality in children and teens through a mutual love of moving our bodies! This program is intended to bring together students of all backgrounds in a safe space in which they can learn together and from another while doing what our bodies were made to do…move! Classes are offered for different ages and interests, and provide a structured platform for age-appropriate technique, improvisation, composition and play! SCDT Youth Dance is an ideal place for students of all levels interested in developing their knowledge of dance and movement, while having a whole lot of fun doing so. Learn more and enroll at www.scdtnoho.com.

Nonotuck Community School is accepting applications for children 15 mos. to 5 years for a September start date in their 12-month program. Open from 7:30am-5:30pm and located in Northampton, Nonotuck has well-appointed classrooms, daily access to indoor and outdoor play spaces an art studio, yoga instruction, Kaboom! Imagination Play equipment, gardening & more. The curriculum is play-based and impaired by progressive early childhood education theory. A parent cooperative, Nonotuck emphasizes community, emotional intelligence, and resilience, and provides ample opportunities for cognitive, artistic, social, emotional, and physical development throughout the school day. Contact info@nonotuck.org, 413-586-5996, or online at www.nonotuck.org.

ADVERTISE HERE: Want to reach thousands of families living across Western MA? See your community event, after-school program, summer camp, class, school, open house, audition, homeschool program, workshop, volunteer opportunity, wellness program, local business, fundraiser, or non-profit featured here in the Bulletin Board section of our list of Weekly Suggested Events and in our weekly eNewsletter! Find out about our affordable advertising options and how you can partner with Hilltown Families in your online marketing by contacting us at info@hilltownfamilies.org.

Featured Directories


LIST OF WEEKLY SUGGESTED EVENTS
August 31-September 13, 2019

Saturday, Aug 31Sunday, Sept 1
Monday, Sept 2Tuesday, Sept 3Wednesday, Sept 4
Thursday, Sept 5Friday, Sept 6

Saturday, Sept 7Sunday, Sept 8
Monday, Sept 9Tuesday, Sept 10Wednesday, Sept 11
Thursday, Sept 12Friday, Sept 13

Weekly eNewsletter | Advertise/Sponsorship | Cultural Itineraries | Berkshire Family Fun
Suggest an Event | Forecast | Museum Passes | Farmers’ Markets | Storyhour & Playgroups| en Español

Events Happening in the Hilltown


SATURDAY, AUGUST 31

Saturday, August 31, 6-10am – FAMILY RADIO/COMMERCIAL-FREE: Every Saturday, Valley Free Radio offers four hours of commercial-free, quality family program from 6-10am. Tune in on your FM dial to 103.3FM WXOJ (Northampton, MA), or listen live via streaming audio at www.valleyfreeradio.org. From 9-10am is the Hilltown Family Variety Show Scrapbooking Spectacular Episode with Recess Monkey. Recess Monkey leads listeners on a wacky, musical step-by-step process for creating photo memory books that will rival any Instagram post.Click here select from over 12 years of archived shows! It’s better than Saturday morning cartoons! Turn off the T.V. and turn on local community radio!

Saturday, August 31, 8am-9pm – LOCAL HERITAGE/AGRICULTURAL FAIR: Agricultural fairs help to preserve our local history by showcasing the skills, crafts, and home-grown produce unique to rural life. Through participation in these rich traditions, we support the preservation of culture and a connection to place. These generations-old traditions of agriculture, self-sufficiency, and resiliency in rural communities afford families opportunities to participate in intergenerational community-based traditions while offering a myriad of entertainment and skill-sharing experiences inspired by a shared interest in traditional crafts, history, land, and art. The annual Blandford Fair will feature many opportunities to learn about farming and agriculture, along with midway games and rides, live performances, and more! See full schedule at Blandford Fair. 413-848-0995. 10 North Street. Blandford, MA.

Saturday, August 31, 10am-5pm – PICTURE BOOK ART/EXHIBIT: The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art celebrates the golden anniversary of William Steig’s seminal book Sylvester and the Magic Pebble. Steig’s famous fable tells of Sylvester Duncan, a donkey who discovers a magic pebble and accidentally turns himself into a rock. With humor and pathos, Steig illustrates an emotional tale of discovery, loss, and reunion. Above all, it is a story about the love of family. William Steig’s Sylvester and the Magic Pebble: A Golden Anniversary is on view through December 1 in The Carle’s Central Gallery. The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art. 413-559-6300. 125 W Bay Rd, Amherst, MA.

Saturday, August 31, 10am-6pm – FOOD FESTIVAL/PEACHES: Peaches have been cultivated in China since the Neolithic period, more than ten thousand years ago! Unsurprisingly, the peach has enormous cultural significance in Chinese society to this day. It is said that when ancient Chinese emperors traveled abroad, they were preceded by sorcerers, who wielded peach rods to dispel evil spirits. Peach wood in particular, has continued to be prized for its protective qualities and has been used to build ‘door gods,’ guardian deities and spirits whose likenesses are portrayed on doors to homes. Among traditional medicine practitioners in China, peach wands are still used to perform exorcisms and cleansing rituals. The vivacity of the peach fruit also inspired many European painters to depict it as a symbol for blossoming health, as seen in works by Van Gogh, Caravaggio, Renoir, and Monet, among others. Late summer is the perfect time to indulge in fresh peaches. Visit the annual Peach Fest at Apex Orchard with live music, local food, vendors, and of course, PEACHES! Apex Orchards. 413-625-2744. 225 Peckville Rd. Shelburne, MA.

Saturday, August 31, 10am-9:30pm – AGRICULTURAL FAIR: Since 1818, the Three County Fair in Northampton has been showcasing local agriculture. America’s longest running agricultural fair was originally established as an agricultural society, designed to promote agricultural knowledge and appreciation. Over the years, the fair has stayed true to its original mission and expanded to include live music, delicious food, and lots of fun activities for children and adults. Livestock demonstrations are still a huge part of the fair experience and awards are given for both agricultural and domestic animals. Don’t miss one of the most beloved local events of the year! For more information and a complete list of events, visit 3 County Fair. 413-584-2237. 54 Fair Street. Northampton, MA.

Saturday, August 31, 10:30am & 1pm – NATURE-BASED/SNAKES & HIKES: Snakes have survived for millions of years, which is amazing since they don’t have legs or arms. Learn just what they need to do live from day to day at 10:30am at “Life Around the Lake: Snakes.” Meet at Bray Lake. Then, at 1pm, join in a 1.5-hour hike on the Quarry Trail. The terrain is mostly easy and the pace moderate. Along the way, quarrying at Mt. Tom is discussed. Bring water and bug spray. Meet at the Stone House Visitor Center. Mt. Tom State Reservation. 413-527-4805. 125 Reservation Rd, Holyoke, MA.

Saturday, August 31, 12noon-4pm – STORYWALK/BUTTERFLIES: Monarch Butterfly Story Walk: Gotta Go! Gotta Go! Join folks for a migratory journey on the grounds of the Great Falls Discovery Center, as you read together the story of “a teeny-tiny creepy-crawly bug” (a Monarch butterfly caterpillar), who learns to eat milkweed, take a rest in a chrysalis, meet new friends, and fly with new butterfly wings, all the way to Mexico. Everyone is welcomed. If it rains, the story walk and butterfly making will be inside the center. Great Falls Discovery Center. 413-863-3221. 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls, MA.

Saturday, August 31, Self-Directed – CITIZEN SCIENCE/BUTTERFLIES: Monarch butterflies make perhaps the most epic of all migratory journeys! In this post, we feature an amazing video using Google Earth to track their journey and share ways families can protect them as citizen scientists: Monarch Butterflies: Migratory Patterns & Citizen Scientists Opportunities. Want to organize a Monarch Butterfly tagging effort? Monarch Watch has instructions and kits with tags for tracking.

Saturday, August 31, 12:30-1:30pm – MARINE BIOLOGY: Ever wonder what fish, turtles, and lizards eat when they live in aquariums? How do human beings determine what to feed these creatures, who have evolved over millions of years to hunt for food in the wild? And who actually prepares the food for these animals? All these questions and more will be addressed during Chow Time at the Berkshire Museum, where participants can assist museum staff in preparing meals for some of the inhabitants of the aquarium. Berkshire Museum. 413-443-7171. 39 South St, Pittsfield, MA.

Saturday, August 31, 1-4pm – COMMUNITY MEALS/ARGICULTURAL FAIRS: Community meal at the Blandford Fair. today: Ham, Baked Beans, Pasta Salad, Coleslaw & Cornbread! Intergenerational opportunities to gather around the table for a community meal with friends and neighbors are available at nearly every agricultural fair. From blueberry pancake breakfast to BBQ chicken dinner, there’s something for everyone! Visit fair websites to see what’s being served this year and make plans to sit with your neighbors and start up conversations. Let your children learn about local history through stories your elderly neighbors might share, make new friends, and walk away with new community connections. Read more about community harvest meals and festivals in our Late Summer/Early Autumn Season issue of Learning Ahead.

Saturday, August 31, 2-3pm – ZOOLOGY/BONES: Call all naturalists! Have you ever wanted to see the skull of a deer? Or maybe find out how to tell male and female fishers apart? Bones may not be able to talk, but there is still more to learn from them. Mt. Holyoke State Park is offering a 1-hour class on bones! “Speaking with Skills” is an intergenerational opportunity for lifelong learners and families with kids 8yo+, an informal program with skulls from different species. Held outdoors. Insect repellent recommended. Meet at the picnic tables. In case of rain, meet inside the Notch Visitor Center. Mt. Holyoke Range State Park. 413-253-2883 . 1500 West St. Amherst, MA.

Saturday, August 31, 6-10pm – PLACEMAKING/COMMUNITY FESTIVAL: Come together in community to celebrate in the park through music, food, and art for the Millpond.Live series. Millside Park. 413-529-1400. 2 Ferry St. Easthampton, MA.

Saturday, August 31, 7pm – PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT/TRAIN RIDE: Hoosac Valley Train rides are great for a special date night. Travel 10 miles on a one-hour scenic train trip through history. Staff are excited to share this rail experience with you. This evening is one of their select Cabaret Train Rides with live cabaret singers Ron and Samantha. BYO beverages & snacks. Purchase tickets online only to guarantee your seats or come 30 minutes before ride to purchase tickets at the counter. 413-663-4189. Adams Welcome Center. 3 Hoosac St, Adams, MA.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1

Sunday, September 1, 7-8am – RADIO SHOW: Commercial-free family radio. Encore of the Hilltown Family Variety Show Scrapbooking Spectacular Episode with Recess Monkey. Recess Monkey leads listeners on a wacky, musical step-by-step process for creating photo memory books that will rival any Instagram post. Tune in on your FM dial, or listen live via streaming audio at www.valleyfreeradio.org. Click here select from over 12 years of archived shows!

Sunday, September 1, Dawn-Dusk – SCULPTURE/AGRICULTURE: Park Hill Orchard in Easthampton is home of “Art in the Orchard,” a biennal orchard-based gallery of outdoor sculptures and installation art to peruse with family from dawn to dusk any day of the week. Bringing “Culture into Horticulutre,” the orchard features the work of dozens of artists whose work is brought to life amongst the apple trees and changing landscape as we move from summer to fall. Park Hill Orchard. 413-527-6186. 82 Park Hill Road. Easthampton, MA.

Sunday, September 1, 8am – SUSTAINABILITY/COLLABORATIVE CONSUMPTION: The annual UMass New2U Tag Sale supports sustainability by providing students and community members with everything from futons, televisions, clothing, decorations and more- all secondhand. This event is open to the public and will take place at the UMass Amherst Student Union Ballroom. 280 Hicks Way. Amherst, MA.

Sunday, September 1, 8am-9pm – LOCAL HERITAGE/AGRICULTURAL FAIR: Agricultural fairs help to preserve our local history by showcasing the skills, crafts, and home-grown produce unique to rural life. Through participation in these rich traditions, we support the preservation of culture and a connection to place. These generations-old traditions of agriculture, self-sufficiency, and resiliency in rural communities afford families opportunities to participate in intergenerational community-based traditions while offering a myriad of entertainment and skill-sharing experiences inspired by a shared interest in traditional crafts, history, land, and art. The annual Blandford Fair will feature many opportunities to learn about farming and agriculture, along with midway games and rides, live performances, and more! See full schedule at Blandford Fair. 413-848-0995. 10 North Street. Blandford, MA.

Sunday, September 1, 10am-6pm – FOOD FESTIVAL/PEACHES: Peaches have been cultivated in China since the Neolithic period, more than ten thousand years ago! Unsurprisingly, the peach has enormous cultural significance in Chinese society to this day. It is said that when ancient Chinese emperors traveled abroad, they were preceded by sorcerers, who wielded peach rods to dispel evil spirits. Peach wood in particular, has continued to be prized for its protective qualities and has been used to build ‘door gods,’ guardian deities and spirits whose likenesses are portrayed on doors to homes. Among traditional medicine practitioners in China, peach wands are still used to perform exorcisms and cleansing rituals. The vivacity of the peach fruit also inspired many European painters to depict it as a symbol for blossoming health, as seen in works by Van Gogh, Caravaggio, Renoir, and Monet, among others. Late summer is the perfect time to indulge in fresh peaches. Visit the annual Peach Fest at Apex Orchard with live music, local food, vendors, and of course, PEACHES! Apex Orchards. 413-625-2744. 225 Peckville Rd. Shelburne, MA.

Sunday, September 1, 10am-9:30pm – AGRICULTURAL FAIR: Since 1818, the Three County Fair in Northampton has been showcasing local agriculture. America’s longest running agricultural fair was originally established as an agricultural society, designed to promote agricultural knowledge and appreciation. Over the years, the fair has stayed true to its original mission and expanded to include live music, delicious food, and lots of fun activities for children and adults. Livestock demonstrations are still a huge part of the fair experience and awards are given for both agricultural and domestic animals. Don’t miss one of the most beloved local events of the year! For more information and a complete list of events, visit 3 County Fair. 413-584-2237. 54 Fair Street. Northampton, MA.

Sunday, September 1, 10:30am & 1pm – NATURE-BASED/BIRDING & BEAVERS: Birding for beginners starts at 10:30am. This one hour program is meant to help beginners learn the basics of birding. The use of bird guides, lists, and binoculars are used to learn about these feathered creatures. Then at 1pm is a family program, “Beaver Dress Up.” Beavers are amazing with all their adaptations to help them survive. This program delves into the different “tools” beavers have to be nature’s engineers. A brave person from the audience dresses up as a beaver to illustrate the adaptations and how they work. Meet at the Stone House Visitor Center for both programs. Mt. Tom State Reservation. 413-527-4805. 125 Reservation Rd, Holyoke, MA.

Sunday, September 1, 11am-5pm – ART STUDIES/VAN GOGH: Van Gogh for All at the Springfield Museums’ D’Amour Museum of Fine Arts. Van Gogh for All immerses visitors in the works of the world’s most famous painter. Designed to engage 21st-century audiences in the 19th-century art of Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), this experientially-rich exhibition uses modern technology and participatory learning to introduce audiences of all ages to Van Gogh’s genius, his personal struggles, and his creative process. Visitors can literally jump right into Van Gogh’s artwork to discover the unusual perspective of Van Gogh’s bedroom, get behind the shutters of Van Gogh’s yellow house, or become part of one of Van Gogh’s famous landscapes. The exhibit offers multiple photo ops and opportunities to create your own art—with stations for drawing a still life or a portrait. Many of the elements in the exhibition are interactive, offering the visitor the opportunity to manipulate the artist’s work in new ways, including through a 12-foot-wide, electronic version of Van Gogh’s Starry Night. Springfield Museums. 413-263-6800. 21 Edwards Street, Springfield, MA

Sunday, September 1, 12-5pm – PICTURE BOOK ART/EXHIBIT: The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art celebrates the golden anniversary of William Steig’s seminal book Sylvester and the Magic Pebble. Steig’s famous fable tells of Sylvester Duncan, a donkey who discovers a magic pebble and accidentally turns himself into a rock. With humor and pathos, Steig illustrates an emotional tale of discovery, loss, and reunion. Above all, it is a story about the love of family. William Steig’s Sylvester and the Magic Pebble: A Golden Anniversary is on view through December 1 in The Carle’s Central Gallery. The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art. 413-559-6300. 125 W Bay Rd, Amherst, MA.

Sunday, September 1, 1pm – COMMUNITY MEAL/FIREMAN’S BBQ: Throughout history, community has been built through the sharing of food. Shared throughout the world as a universal human need, food provides a common thread through which all people can be woven together. Community meals offer much to families regarding learning opportunities, supporting intergenerational engagement, storytelling, and establishing a shared history. An additional benefit of community meals is that the theme of food serves as a common interest for all those involved, providing a foundation upon which for further connections to be built. During the late summer, community harvest meals are great intergenerational opportunities to sit down with neighbors of all ages, making connections and nurturing relationships across the generations. Participating in a community meal does more than filling your belly… it strengthens the social fabric of the community by developing a sense of place in our children! There are a few annual community harvest meals to check out in the late summer include the Plainfield Volunteer Fire Department annual community chicken barbecue. Dinner will be served starting at 1pm. As always, the meal will include a 1⁄2 barbecued chicken, locally grown baked potato, corn on the cob, homemade cole slaw, dinner roll, slice of watermelon and a beverage. Behind the Shaw Memorial Library. Main Street. Plainfield, MA.

Sunday, September 1, 1pm-3:30pm – LOCAL HISTORY/MUSEUM OPEN HOUSE: The Keep Homestead Museum is home to items collected by the Keep family who lived there for over 150 years. The collection includes furniture, silver and cut glass, collections of rocks, minerals and shells, quilts and other needlework done by the women of the family, along with the extensive button collection (the pride of the museum). There are also new printed and framed records, bought at Skinner Auction in August 2017. Community members Are invited to tour the museum and marvel at the bedroom that Charles and Pearl Keep moved into on their wedding day in 1893, that has the original wallpaper, carpet, furniture and the bill-of-sale for the furniture. Keep Homestead Museum. 413-267-4137. 35 Ely Rd. Monson, MA.

Sunday, September 1, 2-4pm – LANGUAGE ARTS/POETRY: Straw Dog Writers Guild and Belding Memorial Library hosts, Writers Read/Hilltowns. Bring Your Poetry! Bring Your Prose! Find Your Public! Uplift Our Souls! Here’s how it works: The featured writer reads recent work and describes the journey to publication, followed by Q & A. Then the floor opens to other writers, who can read for five minutes each; we also draw two names for 10-minute readings. If you want to read, put your name in the hat before 2:15pm. Belding Memorial Library. 413-628-4414. 344 Main St, Ashfield, MA

Sunday, September 1, 2-4pm – LOCAL HISTORY: Video games? Television? View-Masters? No. Not yet. Take a step back in time to the late 1800s at the Westhampton Museum & Blacksmith Shop to see some really basic entertainment. Stereoscope viewers were all the rage and those fortunate enough to own them planned parties around showing their newly arrived images. The ruins of Athens and Scottish castles were very popular themes, but local images such as those taken of the aftermath of the 1874 Mill River Flood also quickly made their way to the western MA. marketplace. After a few weeks, friends, cousins, and neighbors would swap collections for some variety. Come to the museum and see what you can see through their stereoscope viewer! Westhampton Museum & Blacksmith Shop. 413-527-3209. 5 Stage Road. Westhampton, MA.


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2

Monday, September 2, 8am-6pm – LOCAL HERITAGE/AGRICULTURAL FAIR: Agricultural fairs help to preserve our local history by showcasing the skills, crafts, and home-grown produce unique to rural life. Through participation in these rich traditions, we support the preservation of culture and a connection to place. These generations-old traditions of agriculture, self-sufficiency, and resiliency in rural communities afford families opportunities to participate in intergenerational community-based traditions while offering a myriad of entertainment and skill-sharing experiences inspired by a shared interest in traditional crafts, history, land, and art. The annual Blandford Fair will feature many opportunities to learn about farming and agriculture, along with midway games and rides, live performances, and more! See full schedule at Blandford Fair. 413-848-0995. 10 North Street. Blandford, MA.

Monday, September 2, 10am-7:30pm – LOCAL HERITAGE/AGRICULTURAL FAIR: Since 1818, the Three County Fair in Northampton has been showcasing local agriculture. America’s longest running agricultural fair was originally established as an agricultural society, designed to promote agricultural knowledge and appreciation. Over the years, the fair has stayed true to its original mission and expanded to include live music, delicious food, and lots of fun activities for children and adults. Livestock demonstrations are still a huge part of the fair experience and awards are given for both agricultural and domestic animals. Don’t miss one of the most beloved local events of the year! For more information and a complete list of events, visit 3 County Fair. 413-584-2237. 54 Fair Street. Northampton, MA.

Monday, September 2, 10:30am & 1pm – NATURE-BASED/TOTS & SENIORS: Storytime for children at 10:30am, their chance to hear some of their favorite nature storybooks read out loud. Plus if your child has a book, they would to share with others, bring it along to add to the story line-up. Then at 1pm, seniors and others who want more of a challenging hike can join in on a 1-2 hour hike up one of the more strenuous trails at Mt. Tom. The hike on these trails is at a slower pace. Bring water. Meet at the Stone House Visitor Center for both programs. Mt. Tom State Reservation. 413-527-4805. 125 Reservation Rd, Holyoke, MA.

Monday, September 2, 5-7:30pm – COMMUNITY MEAL/FUNDRAISER: Soup and Games Night. Hope & Olive Restaurant. 413-774-3150. 44 Hope St, Greenfield, MA.


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

Tuesday, September 3, Sunrise-Sunset – HISTORY WALK/SELF-DIRECTED: Have you ever walked, biked, or driven through downtown Holyoke and wondered about the history of the city’s numerous old buildings? Each empty mill, towering church, and brick rowhouse tells a story of the city’s past. An exploration of Holyoke’s history reveals a vibrant, diverse, and complicated history. Visitors to Holyoke can now learn about the city’s history themselves – from home or while exploring the city’s streets thanks to the Wistariahurst Museum. The Museum hosts a large online community resource to its repertoire- the Holyoke History Walk, available on the museum’s website, offering a comparative look at the city and many of its streets and buildings as they once were (up to 125 years ago). The program uses Google Maps and provides a map – created by piecing together numerous maps from the museum’s archives – of Holyoke past, layered above a map of Holyoke present. Scattered across the map are over 100 of the city’s landmarks – churches, civic buildings, prominent businesses, and views across the canal, from hilltops, and down various streets in the busiest parts of town. The old photos are shown next to a current image of the location. In some cases, the buildings are unrecognizable; in others, entire blocks are boarded up; meanwhile, some others remain relatively unchanged. Families can use the interactive tour to learn all about local history and can apply what they learn about the city to bring context and more in-depth understanding to American history and changes in industries, technology, and the American way of life. Holyoke, MA

Tuesday, September 3, 10-11:30am – INTERPRETIVE WALK/LOCAL HISTORY: Morning Canal Walk at Holyoke Heritage State Park. Join the Park Interpreter for a walk around the block, stopping at points of historical significance. Discussions include how Holyoke has evolved from a major manufacturing city to a thriving cultural center. Each walk in the series will touch upon a specific historical or contemporary topic. Wear appropriate footwear and bring water. Heavy rain cancels. Suitable for individuals and families with children, ages 8 and older (siblings welcome). Holyoke Heritage State Park. 413-534-1723. 221 Appleton Street, Holyoke, MA.

Tuesday, September 3, 10-10:45am – STORYTIME/CREATIVE FREE-PLAY: New England lore holds that the character of Mother Goose was actually based on a 17th century Bostonian woman, who became famous for singing songs and telling stories to children in her neighborhood. Unfortunately there is no evidence that this is true and the first occurrence of the name “Mother Goose,” appears in a volume of collected fairy tales from 1780, entitled Mother Goose’s Melody. Join Kay Lyons for her popular “Mother Goose on the Loose” series of lap-sit story hours for children under 3. This event will also feature games, puppets, and other toys for children to play with. Greenfield Public Library. 413-772-1544. 402 Main Street, Greenfield, MA..

Tuesday, September 3, 2:30pm – OUTDOOR ADVENTURE: Explorers Club at Mt. Tom for kids ages 10-14. This weekly 1-2 hour program lets kids learn map reading skills, how to read trail markings and proper hiking techniques as they travel on all the trails at Mt. Tom. Nature is observed closely and discussed. Bring water and bug spray. Meet at the Stone House Visitor Center. Mt. Tom State Reservation. 413-527-4805. 125 Reservation Rd, Holyoke, MA.

Tuesday, September 3, 4:30-5:30pm – Learn the art of modern yoyo at the A2Z Science & Learning Store in downtown Northampton! Professional yoyo players teach FREE classes 3 days a week in the back of the store. Start by learning the basics with classic tricks like “Rock the Baby” or “Around the World” and then get ready to take it to the next level with modern yo-yos that feature ball bearings for long spin time and truly next level string tricks that will amaze! Great for ages 7 and up. No advanced sign up is required. (Great for parent and child to do together!) YoYo School happens every Tues, Fri, & Sat, 4:30-5:30pm. For changes or questions, visit www.A2ZScience.com or contact Contact@A2ZScience.com, or call 413-586-1611.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4

Wednesday, September 4, 10am-1pm – ART STUDIES/FIGURE DRAWING: Wednesday Drawing Group. Lifelong learners interested in figure drawing can learn about and practice together every Wednesday. Each Wednesday morning session begins with a nude model assuming a series of short poses that increase in length from 2-30 minutes. There are no requirements other than a desire to draw, so bring paper and pencil, watercolors, crayons… whatever medium you choose. Beginners and experts and all in between are welcome. No critique or instructions, just drawing. Tables, chairs, and easels provided. Northampton Center for the Arts. 413-336-8937. 33 Hawley Street, Northampton, MA.

Wednesday, September 4, 11am – CREATIVE-FREE PLAY/TODDLERS: Listen to stories and songs, move around, and have fun with puppets and bubbles! A longer, more active storytime for ages 18-36 months. Forbes Library. 413-587-1011. 20 West St, Northampton, MA.

Wednesday, September 4, 4:30pm – DANCE STUDIES/BALLET: Join Pioneer Valley Ballet for its 2019-2020 Season. PVB offers 11-week pre-professional ballet training sessions in the fall, winter, and spring, plus community dance classes for toddlers, children, teens, and adults. FALL KICKOFF: Fall Session begins September 9. Get to know PVB at its Open House on September 4. Then get excited for The Nutcracker at the “In a Nutshell” party on September 7. Join the cast: Nutcracker Community Auditions (ages 5-10) will also be held September 7, for performances December 13-15. No dance experience necessary. Pioneer Valley Ballet is located in the Eastworks Building at 116 Pleasant Street in Easthampton, MA. Visit them online to explore classes and events and to register. 413-527-6363 ♦ www.pioneervalleyballet.org

Wednesday, September 4, 6:30-8pm – NATURAL HISTORY/BEAVERS: Did you know that during the 17th century the Roman Catholic Church ruled that for the purposes of dietary laws, beavers should technically be considered as a species of fish? This ruling meant that the ordinary prohibition on meat consumption on Fridays did not extend to beaver meat. Beavers, the second largest rodent in the world, are probably best known for nature’s engineers with their amazing ability to alter their environment by constructing dams and lodges. These structures serve a number of important functions for beavers, including protection from predators and storing food for the winter. Spend an evening searching for beavers and learning all about these industrious critters at Mass Audubon Pleasant Valley. Participants will learn about their natural history and contribution to changing our local landscape after being reintroduced to the area in the mid-1900’s. Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary. 413-637-0320. 472 West Mountain Road, Lenox, MA.

Wednesday, September 4, 7:30-9:30pm – LOCAL HISTORY/LITERARY STUDIES: Edith Wharton once described the human psyche as “a great house full of rooms: there is the hall, through which everyone passes in going in and out; the drawing-room, where one receives formal visits; the sitting-room, where the members of the family come and go as they list; but beyond that, far beyond, are other rooms, the handles of whose doors perhaps are never turned; no one knows the way to them, no one knows whither they lead; and in the innermost room, the holy of holies, the soul sits alone and waits for a footstep that never comes.” It’s easy to imagine that this description was inspired by Wharton’s country estate in Lenox. The Mount was home to Wharton and her husband for nine years, as her husband Edward sought to recover from an acute depressive episode. Over the years the Mount has developed a reputation for paranormal activity, a subject which occupied Wharton since her childhood. She wrote that as a little girl she was “haunted by formless horrors” and went on to write her own highly acclaimed ghost stories. According to some locals, Wharton’s restless spirit continues to wander the halls and corridors of the Mount. If you dare, come participate in a Haunted Tour of the Mount, and perhaps you’ll have a chance to see the lady of the house herself! This event is appropriate for ages 12 and above. The Mount. 2 Plunkett Street, Lenox, MA


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5

Thursday, September 5, 3-9pm – LOCAL HERITAGE/AGRICULTURAL FAIR: Agricultural fairs help to preserve our local history by showcasing the skills, crafts, and home-grown produce unique to rural life. Through participation in these rich traditions, we support the preservation of culture and a connection to place. These generations-old traditions of agriculture, self-sufficiency, and resiliency in rural communities afford families opportunities to participate in intergenerational community-based traditions while offering a myriad of entertainment and skill-sharing experiences inspired by a shared interest in traditional crafts, history, land, and art. The annual Franklin County Fair will feature cattle, oxen, poultry, rabbit, draft horse, and sheep as well as a kids’ entertainment tent, live music, a museum, midway, and much more. Visit the website for a full schedule. Franklin County Fair. 413-774-4282. 89 Wisdom Way. Greenfield, MA.

Thursday, September 5, 5-8pm – LAWN CONCERT: Naumkeag at Night! Bring your family and friends for an evening of live music by sunset in the gardens at Naumkeag. Pack a picnic and skip the dishes. Enjoy these last days of summer with your community and family in the Berkshires! Naumkeag. 413-298-3239. 5 Prospect Hill Rd, Stockbridge, MA.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6

Friday, September 6, 9:30am-4pm — FOLK TRADITIONS: What better way for you and your children to learn about life in New England in the 1830s than to be immersed in a historical reenactment of that time, complete with a village of interesting and talented residents, and to participate in the tasks that filled people’s days back then? Visit Old Sturbridge Village for Home School Day, a special opportunity to explore the village and participate in many hands-on activities and demonstrations relating to the theme of “Artisan Crafts and Trades.” Blacksmithing, spinning, pottery, and basket weaving are among the skills that will be celebrated and explored at this event. Visitors may also spend time at the farm to learn how to make cider and to discover the connections between farm life and the seasons, stop in a house to learn how to cook on an open hearth, try traditional games, and visit the printing press to learn how to set and print type. Advance ticket purchase required. Old Sturbridge Village. 800-733-1830. 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road, Sturbridge, MA.

Friday, September 6, 10am-10pm – LOCAL HERITAGE/AGRICULTURAL FAIR: Agricultural fairs help to preserve our local history by showcasing the skills, crafts, and home-grown produce unique to rural life. Through participation in these rich traditions, we support the preservation of culture and a connection to place. These generations-old traditions of agriculture, self-sufficiency, and resiliency in rural communities afford families opportunities to participate in intergenerational community-based traditions while offering a myriad of entertainment and skill-sharing experiences inspired by a shared interest in traditional crafts, history, land, and art. The annual Franklin County Fair will feature cattle, oxen, poultry, rabbit, draft horse, and sheep as well as a kids’ entertainment tent, live music, a museum, midway, and much more. Visit the website for a full schedule. Franklin County Fair. 413-774-4282. 89 Wisdom Way. Greenfield, MA.

Friday, September 6, 4pm – ARCHITECTURE/ECOLOGY: As global warming intensifies, the need for creative ways of adapting to our new climate are vital. There is an increasing scientific consensus that averting climate change is no longer a possibility but there is still much to be done in terms of mitigation. The Living Building at the Hitchcock Center for the Environment is a perfect example of the kind of changes we can make to meet the new challenges of a warming planet. The Living Building is designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of natural systems in our environment. It requires no outside energy to power it and creates its own water. While new technologies may facilitate some of these changes, the truth is that nature itself offers the most profound and effective solutions. If we look there, we will find what we need. Come learn all about this amazing building and the ways that it reproduces natural cycles and functions. Hitchcock Center for the Environment. 413-256-6006, 845 West St, Amherst, MA.

Friday, September 6, 5-8pm – ART STUDIES/PLACEMAKING: Pittsfield is rapidly becoming known as a center for the arts in the region. Every first Friday of the month, come out and explore the works of some of Pittsfield’s most renowned artists with a leisurely stroll through the city’s Upstreet Cultural District. Most of the artists will be in the studios and galleries from 5 to 8pm and will be available to discuss their work. This is a great opportunity to learn about the artistic process. For more information and a completely list of artists and locations, please visit Pittsfield’s First Fridays Artswalk. Downtown Pittsfield, Pittsfield, MA (FREE)

Friday, September 6, 5-11pm – CULTURAL STUDIES/GREEK FESTIVAL: Greek “Glendis” are celebrations, often highlighting Greek culture through traditional Greek food, music, and dance. Every year, St. George’s Greek Orthodox Cathedral hosts a Glendi for thousands of visitors from far and near, providing the best in traditional Greek foods, pastries, music, dancing, and more. All are welcome to this family-friendly festival celebrating Greek-American life and a fun way for the community to share local Greek culture. Greek Cultural Center at the St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral. 413-737-1496. 22 St George Road. Springfield, MA.

Friday, September 6, 7-10:30pm – MUSIC STUDIES/SALSA: Let’s salsa, Springfield! El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico. World-renowned, Grammy-nominated salsa group, El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico, will take the stage in MassMutual Center’s Exhibition Hall. Considered to be one of Puerto Rico’s greatest dance bands, El Gran Combo has ignited dancefloors globally for five decades with its horn-punctuated Latin rhythms and lush vocal harmonies. Led by pianist and musical director, Rafael Ithier, El Gran Combo features vocalists, trombone players, saxophonists, bass players, and a rhythm section including congas, timbales, and bongos. Rumba Caliente will get the party started! Standing room general admission + reserved seating. Doors open at 6pm! MassMutual Center. 413-787-6610. 1277 Main St, Springfield, MA.

Friday, September 6, 7:30-10pm – MUSIC STUDIES/KIRTAN: Krishna Das at First Churches. Krishna Das has been recording albums of traditional Indian chants and song since 1996 and has been on a spiritual journey his entire life. Born and raised on Long Island, New York, Krishna Das has been at the forefront of utilizing western melodic sensibilities in Hindu kirtan (chanting) and satsang while maintaining its traditional base and structure. He is a master of infusing the Indian tradition with modern influences. While staying true to the path of Bhakti, or Devotional Yoga, his music is energized with modern grooves and melodies to create soulful chanting that is eminently accessible to western hearts. First Churches of Northampton. 413-584-9392. 129 Main St, Northampton, MA.


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7

Saturday, September 7, 6-10am – FAMILY RADIO/COMMERCIAL-FREE: Every Saturday, Valley Free Radio offers four hours of commercial-free, quality family program from 6-10am. Tune in on your FM dial to 103.3FM WXOJ (Northampton, MA), or listen live via streaming audio at www.valleyfreeradio.org. From 9-10am is the Hilltown Family Variety Show, Guest DJed by Camille Harris. Click here select from over 12 years of archived shows! It’s better than Saturday morning cartoons! Turn off the T.V. and turn on local community radio!

Saturday, September 7, All Day – LOCAL HERITAGE/GUIDED TOURS: The Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area hosts annual autumn Heritage Walks in September. Well over 50 free, guided interpretive tours are offered throughout Berkshire County. The public is invited to participate in these family-oriented, interpretive walks, offered in partnership with our region’s historic, cultural, and outdoor recreation organizations and the National Park Service. The Heritage Walks are the ideal opportunity to experience and learn about our region’s rich and varied local heritage. Local historians, naturalists, and environmentalists will lead participants on explorations through historic estate gardens and town districts, behind-the-scenes cultural site tours, nature walks, trail hikes, and tours of many of the industrial-site ruins that were once thriving local industries. Examples of opportunities include Native-American and African-American history walks, a canoe paddling trip on the Housatonic River, and a bike tour on scenic country roads. Visit www.HousatonicHeritage.org for a detailed itinerary. Berkshire County, MA.

Saturday, September 7, 9:30-11am – PUPPETRY: Join puppeteer and puppet maker Eric Weiss for a unique puppetry class, Foam & Rod Puppets for Kids. This class focuses on how to build a simple Foam and Rod puppet, creating a character, and the elements needed to do so. Students will learn about the use of foam in puppetry and how dynamic it can make your puppet. Students will then proceed to create their character and build their own puppets. Lastly, participants will manipulate their creations, bringing them to life, and learning to move them and give them emotions. Call to preregister. Northampton Center for the Arts. 413-584-7327. 33 Hawley Street, Northampton, MA.

Saturday, September 7, 10am-12noon – COMPUTER SCIENCE/CODING: Learn to Code with Scratch. Using Scratch, you can program your own interactive stories, games, and animations — and share your creations with others in the incredible worldwide Scratch online community. All levels of Scratch experience are welcome to attend this free class. Ages: 8+. Holyoke Codes. Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center. 100 Bigelow St, Holyoke, MA.

Saturday, September 7, 10am-5pm – ARTS FESTIVAL/PLACEMAKING: Slowing down and strolling along our city blocks allows us to take a closer look at the local architecture. By slowing down, we can reflect on a neighborhood’s history, meet neighbors and local residents, listen to and share stories, and develop a better sense of where we are in the context of our urban communities. When a street is filled with over 100 artists, strolling musicians, and food vendors, there is even more to learn and enjoy! Spend part of your weekend at the annual Mattoon Street Arts Festival, the longest-running arts festival in the Pioneer Valley. A beautiful Victorian street, the historic Mattoon Street will be filled with artisan-made crafts, fine art, and food. When you see art (or food) that interests you, be sure to stop and ask the artist/vendor about it to learn about the related processes, history, and culture. Free parking at TD Bank lot (Harrison Avenue & Dwight Street). Mattoon Street Arts Festival. 413-736-0629. Mattoon Street. Springfield, MA.

Saturday, September 7, 8am-10pm – LOCAL HERITAGE/AGRICULTURAL FAIR: Agricultural fairs help to preserve our local history by showcasing the skills, crafts, and home-grown produce unique to rural life. Through participation in these rich traditions, we support the preservation of culture and a connection to place. These generations-old traditions of agriculture, self-sufficiency, and resiliency in rural communities afford families opportunities to participate in intergenerational community-based traditions while offering a myriad of entertainment and skill-sharing experiences inspired by a shared interest in traditional crafts, history, land, and art. The annual Franklin County Fair will feature cattle, oxen, poultry, rabbit, draft horse, and sheep as well as a kids’ entertainment tent, live music, a museum, midway, and much more. Visit the website for a full schedule. Franklin County Fair. 413-774-4282. 89 Wisdom Way. Greenfield, MA.

Saturday, September 7, 11am – FAMILY CONCERT/BILINGUAL: September brings a great line up at events at The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, MA. Mister G, the bilingual rock star, will get you dancing and share and sign his new book, Señorita Mariposa. Reservations are recommended. The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art. 413-559-6300. 125 W Bay Rd, Amherst, MA.

Saturday, September 7, 11am-4pm – AGRICULTURAL FAIR: The annual Sheffield Fair is a lovely, manageably-sized fair that is perfect for those who would like the agricultural fair experience without the hustle and bustle. There will be interactive animal showings, children’s games, family activities, demonstrations, live music, and much more! The organizers of this fair have also created this site to include a setting and convenience features that offer easy access for people with physical disabilities and free to everyone. Sheffield Fair. Sheffield Town Park. Frederic Lane, Sheffield, MA.

Saturday, September 7, 11am-6pm – RELIGIOUS STUDIES/PAGANISM: Western MA Pagan Pride Day. Calling Wiccans, Asatru, druids, witches, Rodnovers, Romuva, Goddess worshippers, and all other pagans and interested community members! The word “pagan” is derived from the Latin word “paganus,” meaning “rustic” or “pertaining to the countryside.” During the days of early Christianity, within the Roman Empire, the term came to be used as a derogatory, pejorative term for non-Christians. Beginning in the nineteenth century, however, the term began to be used in a new context, by scholars, individuals, and communities who were inspired by the pre-Christian traditions of Europe, North Africa, and the Near East. This movement was influenced by the work of folklorists such as the brothers Grimm, who revived traditional stories, and the rediscovery of Old Gaelic and Old Norse literature. Modern paganism became even more established during the second half of the twentieth century, when counter cultural movements like feminism became integrated with pagan beliefs. The seminal American author Starhawk, for instance, was a key figure in developing an explicitly feminist spirituality, in the form of the Goddess movement. While Paganism has no single set of beliefs, texts, or structures, there are some commonalities. Typically, Paganism refers to the traditional spiritual systems and beliefs of pre-Christian Europe and surrounding areas. Paganism, almost without exception, can be characterized as earth-based spirituality and can even be seen as an outgrowth or parallel development to the environmental movement. There is also considerable differences between pagan communities that draw inspiration from past traditions to create an explicitly ‘modern’ spirituality and those that seek to actually recreate or revive indigenous religions, based on existing texts and customs. Come meet fellow pagans or just come to learn more about this wonderful community, at the annual Western MA Pagan Pride Day! Florence Civic Center. 90 Park Street, Florence, MA (FREE)

Saturday, September 7, 12noon-11pm – CULTURAL STUDIES/GREEK FESTIVAL: Greek “Glendis” are celebrations, often highlighting Greek culture through traditional Greek food, music, and dance. Every year, St. George’s Greek Orthodox Cathedral hosts a Glendi for thousands of visitors from far and near, providing the best in traditional Greek foods, pastries, music, dancing, and more. All are welcome to this family-friendly festival celebrating Greek-American life and a fun way for the community to share local Greek culture. Greek Cultural Center at the St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral. 413-737-1496. 22 St George Road. Springfield, MA.

Saturday, September 7, 2-4pm (Social), 5pm (Dinner) – COMMUNITY MEAL/LOBSTER: Throughout history, community has been built through the sharing of food. Shared throughout the world as a universal human need, food provides a common thread through which all people can be woven together. Community meals offer much to families regarding learning opportunities, supporting intergenerational engagement, storytelling, and establishing a shared history. An additional benefit of community meals is that the theme of food serves as a common interest for all those involved, providing a foundation upon which for further connections to be built. During the late summer, community harvest meals are great intergenerational opportunities to sit down with neighbors of all ages, making connections and nurturing relationships across the generations. Participating in a community meal does more than filling your belly… it strengthens the social fabric of the community by developing a sense of place in our children! One such opportunity that pulls from our coastal communities includes the Easthampton Rotary Annual Lobster Bake! Call to reserve tickets: 413-222-9091. Rotary Club of Easthampton. Easthampton, MA.

Saturday, September 7, 6-10pm – PLACEMAKING/COMMUNITY FESTIVAL: Come together in community to celebrate in the park through music, food, and art for the Millpond.Live series. Millside Park. 413-529-1400. 2 Ferry St. Easthampton, MA.


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

Sunday, September 8, 7-8am – RADIO SHOW: Commercial-free family radio. Encore of the Hilltown Family Variety Show, Guest DJed by Camille Harris. Tune in on your FM dial, or listen live via streaming audio at www.valleyfreeradio.org. Click here select from over 12 years of archived shows!

Sunday, September 8, All Day – LOCAL HERITAGE/GUIDED TOURS: The Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area hosts annual autumn Heritage Walks in September. Well over 50 free, guided interpretive tours are offered throughout Berkshire County. The public is invited to participate in these family-oriented, interpretive walks, offered in partnership with our region’s historic, cultural, and outdoor recreation organizations and the National Park Service. The Heritage Walks are the ideal opportunity to experience and learn about our region’s rich and varied local heritage. Local historians, naturalists, and environmentalists will lead participants on explorations through historic estate gardens and town districts, behind-the-scenes cultural site tours, nature walks, trail hikes, and tours of many of the industrial-site ruins that were once thriving local industries. Examples of opportunities include Native-American and African-American history walks, a canoe paddling trip on the Housatonic River, and a bike tour on scenic country roads. Visit www.HousatonicHeritage.org for a detailed itinerary. Berkshire County, MA.

Sunday, September 8, All Day – LOCAL AGRICULTURE/APPLES: Apples, one of the earliest (and most delicious) signs of fall, have been an essential part of New England agriculture for centuries. McIntosh apples are undeniably the most iconic of New England’s apples, and make up over two thirds of the regions apple crop! Macs and countless other delicious and fascinating varieties of apples are grown at orchards across western Massachusetts, and families can enjoy this year’s fantastic apple crop by visiting an orchard to pick or purchase a bushel. Participate in the tradition of apple-picking and support local agriculture! Check out local orchards and farms in Western MA for Pick Your Own Apples, including Park Hill Orchard (Easthampton), Outlook Farm (Westhampton), Bear Swamp Orchard & Cidery (Ashfield), Quonquont Farm (Whately), Clarkdale Fruit Farms (Deerfield), and Bashista Orchards (Southampton).

Sunday, September 8, 8am-9pm – LOCAL HERITAGE/AGRICULTURAL FAIR: Agricultural fairs help to preserve our local history by showcasing the skills, crafts, and home-grown produce unique to rural life. Through participation in these rich traditions, we support the preservation of culture and a connection to place. These generations-old traditions of agriculture, self-sufficiency, and resiliency in rural communities afford families opportunities to participate in intergenerational community-based traditions while offering a myriad of entertainment and skill-sharing experiences inspired by a shared interest in traditional crafts, history, land, and art. The annual Franklin County Fair will feature cattle, oxen, poultry, rabbit, draft horse, and sheep as well as a kids’ entertainment tent, live music, a museum, midway, and much more. Visit the website for a full schedule. Franklin County Fair. 413-774-4282. 89 Wisdom Way. Greenfield, MA.

Sunday, September 8, TBA: RURAL HERITAGE/CORN MAZE: Corn mazes are classic New England traditions that transform cornfields into community building experiences. Before we had corn mazes, corn has been a staple in the diet of countless cultures for thousands of years. Today, corn is the largest produced crop in the world, and can even be a source of adventure as played out in corn mazes. There are a few in Western MA you can check out with your family starting in September, including Mike’s Maze at Warner Farm in Sunderland Hicks Family Farm Corn Maze in Charlemont, and Meadow View Farm Corn Maze in Southwick. Many of these mazes offer a fun and challenging outdoor adventure for families of all ages, along with other activities and farm-fresh produce and perennials. Let the adventure get your kids curious about corn and it’s variety history and many uses. Educators can use this teacher-friendly guide to the evolution of maize to help get kids interested in learning more!

Sunday, September 8, 10am-5pm – ARTS FESTIVAL/PLACEMAKING: Slowing down and strolling along our city blocks allows us to take a closer look at the local architecture. By slowing down, we can reflect on a neighborhood’s history, meet neighbors and local residents, listen to and share stories, and develop a better sense of where we are in the context of our urban communities. When a street is filled with over 100 artists, strolling musicians, and food vendors, there is even more to learn and enjoy! Spend part of your weekend at the annual Mattoon Street Arts Festival, the longest-running arts festival in the Pioneer Valley. A beautiful Victorian street, the historic Mattoon Street will be filled with artisan-made crafts, fine art, and food. When you see art (or food) that interests you, be sure to stop and ask the artist/vendor about it to learn about the related processes, history, and culture. Free parking at TD Bank lot (Harrison Avenue & Dwight Street). Mattoon Street Arts Festival. 413-736-0629. Mattoon Street. Springfield, MA.

Sunday, September 8, 10am-5pm – LIVING HISTORY/SHAKERS: The Hancock Shaker Village was first established in 1791, the third of the nineteen Shaker communities created in New England and elsewhere in the United States by the founder of the religious ‘Mother’ Ann Lee. Lee, a Mancunian by birth, had visions as a young women in her native England. Fleeing persecution for their unorthodox beliefs, including the renunciation of procreation, Lee and her followers settled in Albany, New York. Until the mid nineteenth century, the Shaker movement continued to grow and the community peaked at around five thousand members. The Shakers promoted celibacy, complete gender equality, radical self sufficiency, and communal living. Come experience Shaker history at the living history museum, Hancock Shaker Village. 413-443-0188. 1843 W Housatonic St, Pittsfield, MA.

Sunday, September 8, 12noon – MUSIC STUDIES/SYMPHONY: Kids’ Corner at Tanglewood is designed to provide a child-friendly experience for families attending BSO Rehearsals or concerts on Saturday mornings and Sunday afternoons at Tanglewood. Located in a grassy area near the Tanglewood Visitors Center, it offers children’s activities that connect to music in a casual, drop-in atmosphere. Children accompanied by adults may take part in musical and crafts activities supervised by BSO staff. Tickets to the Sunday concert or Saturday-morning rehearsal are required. Tanglewood. 413-637-5180. 297 West St. Lenox, MA.

Sunday, September 8, 12noon-7pm – CULTURAL STUDIES/GREEK FESTIVAL: Greek “Glendis” are celebrations, often highlighting Greek culture through traditional Greek food, music, and dance. Every year, St. George’s Greek Orthodox Cathedral hosts a Glendi for thousands of visitors from far and near, providing the best in traditional Greek foods, pastries, music, dancing, and more. All are welcome to this family-friendly festival celebrating Greek-American life and a fun way for the community to share local Greek culture. Greek Cultural Center at the St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral. 413-737-1496. 22 St George Road. Springfield, MA.

Sunday, September 8, 1pm – PICTUREBOOK ARTS:  Join a book party with Mac Barnett and Greg Pizzoli who will showcase their new early reader series, Hi Jack! Young readers will love Barnett’s snappy text, while aspiring artists will enjoy Pizzoli’s ‘How to Draw’ segments at the end of each book. Book signing to follow. Plus, enjoy artmaking, scavenger hunts, storytimes and three galleries of exceptional picturebook art.  The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art. 413-559-6300. 125 W Bay Rd, Amherst, MA.

Sunday, September 8, 1-1:30pm & 3-3:30pm – LOCAL HISTORY/ARCHITECTURE: Western Massachusetts was a popular destination for 19th century Americans with many of the outdoor places and summits still available for today’s hikers and outdoor enthusiasts to explore. In the 19th-century, outdoor recreation became a popular leisure activity. Summit houses, such as the one atop Mount Holyoke in Hadley, were constructed to accommodate tourists traveling to see their landscape with mountain views. An interest in the wild landscape and sweeping view of countryside inspired many Americans to explore the natural landscape and value spending time outside. Take a guided tour of the restored, 1861 version of what has since become known as the Summit House at J.A. Skinner State Park. Compare and contrast the view today to the view in the late 1800’s. What has changed? What has remained the same? How do views from summits help us connect to the places we live and visit? Guided tours of the Summit House are suitable for all ages. Joseph Allen Skinner State Park. 413-596-0350. 10 Skinner State Park Road, Hadley, MA.

Sunday, September 8, 1-3pm – ENTOMOLOGY/BUTTERFLIES: The color and size of the monarch butterfly makes it truly majestic. It’s arduous migration to Mexico has inspired many stories, including Barbara Kingsolver’s 2012 novel Flight Behavior. Come celebrate these beautiful and important creatures and enjoy one of the Pioneer Valley’s most precious treasures at the Annual Monarch Butterfly Release at the Three Sisters Sanctuary. If you have never been to the Three Sisters Sanctuary, you are really in for a treat. It is no exaggeration to say there is nowhere like it on earth. This event is a great opportunity to learn all about monarch butterflies and the roles they play in the ecosystem. Three Sisters Sanctuary. 413-268-3677. 188 Cape Street. Goshen, MA.

Sunday, September 8, 2-4pm – LOCAL HISTORY: Video games? Television? View-Masters? No. Not yet. Take a step back in time to the late 1800s at the Westhampton Museum & Blacksmith Shop to see some really basic entertainment. Stereoscope viewers were all the rage and those fortunate enough to own them planned parties around showing their newly arrived images. The ruins of Athens and Scottish castles were very popular themes, but local images such as those taken of the aftermath of the 1874 Mill River Flood also quickly made their way to the western MA. marketplace. After a few weeks, friends, cousins, and neighbors would swap collections for some variety. Come to the museum and see what you can see through their stereoscope viewer! Westhampton Museum & Blacksmith Shop. 413-527-3209. 5 Stage Road. Westhampton, MA.

Sunday, September 8, 3-5pm – PUPPET SHOW/AGRICULTURE: Bread and Puppet will be performing at Park Hill Orchard in Easthampton is home of “Art in the Orchard,” a biennal orchard-based gallery of outdoor sculptures and installation art to peruse with family. Bringing “Culture into Horticulutre,” the orchard features the work of dozens of artists whose work is brought to life amongst the apple trees and changing landscape as we move from summer to fall. Park Hill Orchard. 413-527-6186. 82 Park Hill Road. Easthampton, MA.


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

Monday, September 9, Sunrise-Sunset – SELF-GUIDED WALK/POETRY: Follow the footsteps of earlier Americans and stay active and healthy during the summer by walking. Many of the local woods and trails in Western Massachusetts were common destinations for 19th-century hikers and fueled the creative genius of many writers. Engage with local history and experience the landscape from a literary perspective by reading some of these writers’ works while on the trail or before you embark on your next outdoor adventure. For example: imagine reading William Cullen Bryant’s The Rivulet, with the poet’s description of the prattling water, as you stand by the same rivulet yourself and hear the same sound (featured in the March/April Season of Learning Ahead)! In a way, the poem acts as a time machine, bridging together the woods of Bryant’s life in the Hilltowns with the same forest you can hike today. Take a self-guided landscape tour and strengthen a sense of place through poetry and the countryside. William Cullen Bryant Homestead. 413- 634-2244. 207 Bryant Road, Cummington, MA.

Monday, September 9, 9am-8pm – SELF-GUIDED HIKE/GEOLOGY: In the 19th-century, outdoor recreation became a popular leisure activity. Summit houses, such as the one atop Mount Holyoke at Skinner State Park, were constructed to accommodate tourists traveling to see mountain views. An interest in the wild landscape and sweeping view of countryside inspired many Americans to explore the natural landscape and value spending time outside. Many writers and artists looked to nature as a creative muse for poetry and painting. Walking through the woods became a pleasurable and meaningful pastime. Contemporary self-guided geology walks are another way to explore this local treasure, with map in hand! Skinner State Park. 413-586-0350. 10 Skinner State Park Road, Hadley, MA. (Parking Fee)

Monday, September 9, 1-4pm – LIVING HISTORY/MUSEUM ADVENTURES: First settled in the early 18th century, the Connecticut River Valley is rich in colonial history. The Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum gives guests a look into the evolution of the region over 250 years, through the history of one family. Learn about how momentous historical events such as the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, and the women’s rights movement impacted the lives of ordinary people in our region. Spend the afternoon visiting this local treasure! Guided tours available Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum. 413-584-4699.130 River Drive, Hadley, MA.

Monday, September 9, 7-9pm – ROBOTS/ASTRONOMY: Nerd Nite NOHO presents two talks tonight. First Talk: “Where the Rubber Meets the Code: Designing Stretchy Sensors and Soft Robots.” Second Talk: “The Brightest Galaxies, Through a Lens Darkly” The Deuce (World War II Club). 413-586-3315. 50 Conz St., Northampton, MA.

Monday, September 9, 6:30-8pm – PARENT SUPPORT/ADHD: Northampton Area Pediatrics host a monthly Valley ADHD Parent Support Group. Join other area parents and caregivers to: Receive ADHD information and support; Be heard without being judged; Hear how others cope with similar issues and challenges; Learn about local resources for families; Hear from area specialists on pertinent topics; Learn new strategies to try at home; Leave feeling empowered and hopeful. Light refreshments will be available. ValleyADHDfamilies@gmail.com. Northampton Area Pediatrics. 413-584-8700193. Locust St., Northampton, MA.

Monday, September 9, 10-11am – HEALTH/QI GONG: Qi Gong literally translates to “life energy cultivation.” This unique practice resembles tai chi, in its mixture of relaxed, slow moving poses, breath work. Qi Gong can be seen as a form of meditation, self healing, even self defense. Originating in ancient Chinese daoist exercises, Qi Gong is now practiced by millions in China and around the world and is the subject of numerous medical research trials, investigating the impact of Qi Gong on pain, hypertension, even cancer. Practioners of all levels are invited to attend this weekly community practice of Qi Gong. Sunderland Public Library. 20 School Street, Sunderland, MA.


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

Tuesday, September 10, Dawn-Dusk – SCULPTURE/AGRICULTURE: Park Hill Orchard in Easthampton is home of “Art in the Orchard,” a biennal orchard-based gallery of outdoor sculptures and installation art to peruse with family from dawn to dusk any day of the week. Bringing “Culture into Horticulutre,” the orchard features the work of dozens of artists whose work is brought to life amongst the apple trees and changing landscape as we move from summer to fall. Park Hill Orchard. 413-527-6186. 82 Park Hill Road. Easthampton, MA.

Tuesday, September 10, Anytime – SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING/BOTANICAL ILLUSTRATION: Taking a class with an artist that specializes in botanical illustration provides the scientific and artistic instruction needed to learn how to create botanical drawings. Botanical illustrations are not just limited to painting flowers, but also include sketching trees and other plant specimens. Not only is botanical illustration a creative outlet, but also a scientific one that lets you explore a plant species at an observational and focused level! The American Society of Botanical Illustrators provides different resources and tools to help students locate classes in their area or informational books on doing an individual study of botanical illustration. Gardens and wayside growing flowers offer an opportunity to engage with the landscape through art, literature, and community. Whether it’s botanical watercolors, illustrations, photography, or a relaxed visit to your local public garden, flowers blooming in a community support interests and connect residents to their public parks and the patterns of the seasons.

Tuesday, September 10, 10am-5pm – ART STUDIES/VAN GOGH: Van Gogh for All at the Springfield Museums’ D’Amour Museum of Fine Arts. Van Gogh for All immerses visitors in the works of the world’s most famous painter. Designed to engage 21st-century audiences in the 19th-century art of Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), this experientially-rich exhibition uses modern technology and participatory learning to introduce audiences of all ages to Van Gogh’s genius, his personal struggles, and his creative process. Visitors can literally jump right into Van Gogh’s artwork to discover the unusual perspective of Van Gogh’s bedroom, get behind the shutters of Van Gogh’s yellow house, or become part of one of Van Gogh’s famous landscapes. The exhibit offers multiple photo ops and opportunities to create your own art—with stations for drawing a still life or a portrait. Many of the elements in the exhibition are interactive, offering the visitor the opportunity to manipulate the artist’s work in new ways, including through a 12-foot-wide, electronic version of Van Gogh’s Starry Night. Springfield Museums. 413-263-6800. 21 Edwards Street, Springfield, MA

Tuesday, September 10, 10-11:30am – INTERPRETIVE WALK/LOCAL HISTORY: Morning Canal Walk at Holyoke Heritage State Park. Join the Park Interpreter for a walk around the block, stopping at points of historical significance. Discussions include how Holyoke has evolved from a major manufacturing city to a thriving cultural center. Each walk in the series will touch upon a specific historical or contemporary topic. Wear appropriate footwear and bring water. Heavy rain cancels. Suitable for individuals and families with children, ages 8 and older (siblings welcome). Holyoke Heritage State Park. 413-534-1723. 221 Appleton Street, Holyoke, MA.

Tuesday, September 10, 6pm – ENTOMOLOGY/ BEEKEEPING: Join local beekeepers for a season-appropriate discussion and demonstration using the Berkshire Botanical Garden apiary. Focus on sustainable beekeeping techniques: raising and sourcing bees locally, managing pests and diseases ecologically, and creating beneficial habitats for honeybees and native pollinators alike. New to beekeeping? Learn how to get started with your first hives. Are you a seasoned beekeeper? Your experience and knowledge will be invaluable to others in the group! 413-357-4657. Berkshire Botanical Garden. 5 West Stockbridge Road, Stockbridge, MA.

Tuesday, September 10, 7pm – CIVICS: Brush up on your civics savviness with “Many-Levered Machines: Government Systems and How to Influence Them,” a program on civics and democracy. Amherst’s former State Rep. Solomon Goldstein-Rose will explain the basics of local, state, and national government systems, expand on the complex set of institutions that form public policy, and lead an interactive exercise to help participants think about where advocates can tap in to make a difference. Appropriate for those with little to no experience with government systems, as well as those with great understandings of institutions but with a desire to become more effective activists. Jones Library. 413-259-3223. 43 Amity St, Amherst, MA.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11

Wednesday, September 11, Sunrise-Sunset – ENTOMOLOGY/SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING: Can Woolley Bears (Pyrrharctia isabella) offer us an indication as to the severity of the coming winter? Common North American folklore says that a wide brown band calls for a mild winter and a narrow one calls for a severe winter. While there is no scientific evidence for this prediction, looking for these little guys and examining them closely with your kids opens up channels for learning while connecting to the seasons.

Wednesday, September 11, Sunrise-Sunset – HISTORY WALK/SELF-DIRECTED: Have you ever walked, biked, or driven through downtown Holyoke and wondered about the history of the city’s numerous old buildings? Each empty mill, towering church, and brick rowhouse tells a story of the city’s past. An exploration of Holyoke’s history reveals a vibrant, diverse, and complicated history. Visitors to Holyoke can now learn about the city’s history themselves – from home or while exploring the city’s streets thanks to the Wistariahurst Museum. The Museum hosts a large online community resource to its repertoire- the Holyoke History Walk, available on the museum’s website, offering a comparative look at the city and many of its streets and buildings as they once were (up to 125 years ago). The program uses Google Maps and provides a map – created by piecing together numerous maps from the museum’s archives – of Holyoke past, layered above a map of Holyoke present. Scattered across the map are over 100 of the city’s landmarks – churches, civic buildings, prominent businesses, and views across the canal, from hilltops, and down various streets in the busiest parts of town. The old photos are shown next to a current image of the location. In some cases, the buildings are unrecognizable; in others, entire blocks are boarded up; meanwhile, some others remain relatively unchanged. Families can use the interactive tour to learn all about local history and can apply what they learn about the city to bring context and more in-depth understanding to American history and changes in industries, technology, and the American way of life. Holyoke, MA.

Wednesday, September 11, 9am-4:30pm – GEOLOGY/LOCAL HISTORY: The Natural Bridge State Park in North Adams is the only natural white marble arch in North America! The rock which forms the bridge is estimated 550 million year old bedrock marble. The arch itself was created by thousands of years of glacial melt water. Come experience the awe-inspiring majesty of this incredible local treasure with a short walking discussion of the geological forces that created this unique site. For more information visit Natural Bridge State Park. McAuley Road, North Adams, MA.

Wednesday, September 11, 10am-1pm – ART STUDIES/FIGURE DRAWING: Wednesday Drawing Group. Lifelong learners interested in figure drawing can learn about and practice together every Wednesday. Each Wednesday morning session begins with a nude model assuming a series of short poses that increase in length from 2-30 minutes. There are no requirements other than a desire to draw, so bring paper and pencil, watercolors, crayons… whatever medium you choose. Beginners and experts and all in between are welcome. No critique or instructions, just drawing. Tables, chairs, and easels provided. Northampton Center for the Arts. 413-336-8937. 33 Hawley Street, Northampton, MA.

Wednesday, September 11, 10am–5pm – MUSEUM ADVENTURES/STEM: Thomas & Friends™: Explore the Rails! at the Springfield Science Museum! Featuring the favorite engines and destinations from Thomas & Friends, the STEM-focused exhibit seeks to engage children (2-7yo) and families in foundational skills that foster STEM literacy through playful learning experiences. The exhibit incorporates foundational STEM practices that encourage thinking mathematically, making comparisons, experimenting to solve problems using a variety of methods and tools, thinking creatively and reflecting on actions and results. Springfield Museums. 413-263-6800. 21 Edwards Street, Springfield, MA.


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12

Thursday, September 12, 10am – ANIMAL HUSBANDRY/CHICKENS: In honor of National Chicken Month, join the Thursday Morning Club at the Greenfield Public Library for The Natural History of the Chicken. The humble chicken finally gets the big-screen tribute it so richly deserves in this documentary, which offers an inside look at America’s $40 billion a year poultry industry, while also casting a gently humorous eye on domesticated chickens and the people who care for them. Greenfield Public Library. 413-772-1544. 402 Main Street, Greenfield, MA.

Thursday, September 12, 5-8pm – LAWN CONCERT: Naumkeag at Night! Bring your family and friends for an evening of live music by sunset in the gardens at Naumkeag. Pack a picnic and skip the dishes. Enjoy these last days of summer with your community and family in the Berkshires! Naumkeag. 413-298-3239. 5 Prospect Hill Rd, Stockbridge, MA.

Thursday, September 12, 7-8:30pm – GARDENING: Edible Perennial Gardening and Landscaping with Naturalist John Root. In this presentation, find out how to establish and maintain a variety of perennials, including trees, shrubs, vines, canes, and herbaceous plants, for harvests of fruits, nuts, and vegetables. Participants learn how to establish and care for these plants using organic methods of cultivation. Nutritional and medicinal benefits of the plants are discussed as well. Great Falls Discovery Center. 413-863-3221. 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls, MA.

Thursday, September 12, 7:30-9:30pm – ASTRONOMY: Astronomers and physicists work with some of the most intriguing ideas in the universe, literally! One of the most intriguing concepts in theoretical physics is the idea of a clock that could keep time even after the universe has ceased to exist. Yes, you read that correctly. A team of researchers at California’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have begun work constructing an eternal clock, based off a model proposed by physicists at MIT. This clock, made from a crystal existing in four dimensions, which is to say time and space, would be composed of charged atoms. The repulsive force between like-charged particles could, theoretically, be calculated at a low enough quantum energy state that its momentum would never become subject to the laws of entropy, the force that gradually erodes all energy in the universe. Thus, a clock constructed from these particles would be able to record time forever. What would it even look like to record time forever? By definition “forever” never ends. The idea of a clock that literally never stops is frankly enough to make ones head explode. Well if you’re excited about astronomy but are looking for something a little less mind-bending, stop by the Orchard Hill Observatory, located at the highest point on the UMass campus, where they host a 16-inch telescope. The Observatory is used to teach observational astronomy and is open to the public every Thursday night. If you’re not sure whether or not the observatory is closed due to clouds, call 413-547-4166 and listen to the recorded message. Click here for directions. UMass. Amherst, MA.

Thursday, September 12, 8:30pm – OUTDOOR MOVIE/PLACEMAKING: Movies Under the Stars at Look Park! Pack a blanket, grab the kids and enjoy a beloved family movie classic outdoors, E.T. the Extra-terrestrial. Entrance to Pines Theater for movies is free. Parking fee applies. Look Memorial Park. 413-584-5457. 300 N Main St, Florence, MA.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

Friday, September 13, 10am-8pm — INSTALLATION ART/CHALK FESTIVAL: Many children have used sidewalk chalk to create drawings, make hopscotch boards, or write notes and signs. When fine artists take to the sidewalks with their own ideas, the materials and setting are still very relatable for–and interesting to– kids, even if the products are quite different. The artists of this year’s Northampton Chalk Art Festival invite everyone to observe as they create new masterpieces on the sidewalks downtown. Watching these artists at work provides opportunities to learn about different techniques, perspective, proportion, and expressing ideas through art. Drawings will be created during the day on Friday and awards for the top creations will be announced in the early evening. The city’s monthly gallery walk coincides with the Chalk Festival for those who would like to explore additional works of art. Organized by the Northampton Center for the Arts. Downtown, Northampton, MA.

Friday, September 13, 5pm – PARADE/MARDI GRAS: Hear that? Mardi Gras is coming to New England! If you’ve never been to New Orleans during Mardi Gras, now’s your chance to get a taste of what it’s like! Complete with colossal floats, imaginative costumes, and dazzling lights, The Big E brings you the Mardi Gras Parade, day and night. Ride on one of eight unique custom-made floats designed and constructed by the Kern Companies of New Orleans. Big E fairgoers line the parade route daily to see these brilliantly crafted floats and to try their luck at catching a handful of bright beads that you will throw. Grande parade happens Friday-Sunday at 5pm. Evening parade happens Monday-Thursday at 7:30pm. Eastern States Exposition. 413-737-2443. 1305 Memorial Ave, West Springfield, MA.

Friday, September 13, 4-5:30pm – FOLK TRADITION/HAT DESIGN: When the temperatures dip, and you need a winter cap to warm your head, think how nice it would be to have a hat you’ve designed and created yourself! The traditional art of knitting and designing apparel like hats is a are folk traditions worthy of discovering and learning how to create on your own. “Designing a Hat” with Suzanne Ress is an opportunity to learn to design your hat before the cold weather arrives! Sheep & Shawl. 413-397-3680. 265 Greenfield Rd, South Deerfield, MA.

Friday, September 13, 4-7pm – ART STUDIES/MUSEUM ADVENTURES: Free Second Fridays at the Smith College Museum of Art gives visitors a special opportunity to explore the collections and engage with art on a deeper level. Create your own work of art, with hands on activities for all ages based on specific works in the museum and go on a special guided conversation tour. Light refreshments. Smith College Museum of Art. 413-585-2760. 20 Elm Street at Bedford Terrace. Northampton, MA.

Friday, September 13, 4:30-5:30pm – Learn the art of modern yoyo at the A2Z Science & Learning Store in downtown Northampton! Professional yoyo players teach FREE classes 3 days a week in the back of the store. Start by learning the basics with classic tricks like “Rock the Baby” or “Around the World” and then get ready to take it to the next level with modern yo-yos that feature ball bearings for long spin time and truly next level string tricks that will amaze! Great for ages 7 and up. No advanced sign up is required. (Great for parent and child to do together!) YoYo School happens every Tues, Fri, & Sat, 4:30-5:30pm. For changes or questions, visit www.A2ZScience.com or contact Contact@A2ZScience.com, or call 413-586-1611. Northampton, MA.


Hilltown Families’ list of Suggested Events is supported in part by grants from the Bernardston, Chester, Heath, Montgomery, Pelham, Rowe, South Hadley, Amherst, Hatfield, Russell, Shutesbury, and Springfield Cultural Councils, local agencies which are supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency.

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