TAKE ACTION: Is That Macaroni & Cheese Talking to Your Kid? Stop Grocery Shelf TV Ads!

Parents to Supermarkets:  Pull the Plug on In-Store TV Ads

"Having TV screens all over the grocery stores undermines my parenting! You simply cannot avoid the presence of television! Not only are they getting to play their ads for our kids, but they are sending the message that it is normal to stare at a screen all day...in the car, at the store, in school...It's truly sickening." - CCFC member Samantha Penrose, mother of three, Urbana, IL

The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood is demanding that the Food Lion supermarket chain pull the plug on 3GTv, a controversial new marketing scheme that airs commercials on mini-televisions attached to grocery store shelves — right next to the product being advertised. This fall, Food Lion and Automated Media Services will conduct a trial of 3GTv in several of its Bloom supermarkets in Maryland and Virginia. A successful test run is likely to have nation-wide consequences, spurring other grocery stores to follow suit.

That’s why CCFC is urging parents, regardless of where they live and shop, to petition Food Lion to shelve its on-shelf commercials.

“When screen-based advertising invades the public sphere, even the most vigilant parents can’t protect children from it,” said CCFC’s Director, Dr. Susan Linn. “It’s time to challenge the notion that marketers have a right to fill every nook and cranny of our lives with televisions and their blaring commercials. If we don’t stop 3GTv now, families will be forced to run a gauntlet of TV advertising in every aisle of every supermarket around the country.”

Televisions at the supermarket checkout counter are already common, exploiting a captive audience waiting in line to pay for groceries. But 3GTv, developed by Automated Media Services, ups the ante. At the exact moment families are making purchasing decisions, in-your-face TV ads will undercut parental authority by compelling children to lobby for the product being advertised.

TAKE ACTION

Do you agree that families have a right to grocery shop without be forced to run a gauntlet of screens blasting commercials in every aisle? Take a moment to tell Food Lion executive Carol Herndon to pull the pull the plug on its grocery store TVs. Click here to find out how.

Consuming Kids: The Commercialization of Childhood

Consuming Kids: The Commercialization of Childhood
New Documentary Film Premiering in Northampton (2009)

The consumer embryo begins to develop during the first year of existence.  Children begin their consumer journey in infancy.  And they certainly deserve consideration as consumers at that time.

– James U. McNeal | Pioneering Youth Marketer

This unsettling quote by a “Pioneering Youth Marketer” opens the critically-acclaimed new documentary film, Consuming Kids: The Commercialization of Childhood. Produced locally by the Northampton-based Media Education Foundation (MEF), Consuming Kids zeroes in on the increasingly brazen practices of the multibillion-dollar youth marketing industry in the wake of deregulation, exposing how marketers have used the latest advances in psychology, anthropology, and neuroscience to target American children and transform them into one of the most influential and profitable consumer demographics in the world.

I was glued to my seat as I watched a review copy of this film, feeling the heat of anger rising up into my cheeks as I learned how marketers are scheming to influence my kid (our kids) to consume their products… for life! My family doesn’t watch commercial television in our home, so it shocked me to see the different television ads aimed at marketing to children, trying to sell them everything from junk food to the family car. But as the film reveals, advertising to our kids isn’t found just on the TV, it’s also found on the school bus, the classroom, cell phones, the internet, movies, and even churches. It’s insidious!

Offering a time-line tracing the evolution and impact of this unprecedented phenomenon, Consuming Kids illustrates how the childhood of American kids has become commercialized and explores how the effect of hyperconsumerism impacts the actual lived experiences of our children.

I think the thing that upsets me the most is that it’s not just products that are being marketed to children, but values. And the primary value that’s being sold to kids over and over and over again is the value that things or stuff or brands will make us happy.

– Susan Linn | Director, Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood

 

Read the rest of this entry »

%d bloggers like this: