Edible Books Connect Culinary Arts & Literature

The Edible Book: A Benefit for the Friends of the Forbes & Lilly Libraries

The Forbes and Lilly Libraries are holding their Edible Book event on Sunday, April 6th this year, an annual event that crosses culinary arts and language arts with creative free play!

If you could make a piece of art that describes your favorite book, what would it look like? If you created a food whose flavor matches your family’s favorite story, what would it taste like? And what do you think would happen if you combined your art piece with the book’s perfect flavor match? Create a real-life edible artistic masterpiece – just like you’ve imagined! – by participating in Forbes Library’s event, Edible Book Northampton!

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Edible Books Encourage Creative Free Play in the Kitchen

The Edible Book: A Benefit for the Friends of the Forbes & Lilly Libraries

Edible Book events have been held worldwide since 1999! This is the Forbes and Lilly Libraries 6th annual event. Registration deadline is April 16th and the event takes place on April 22nd at the Florence Civic Center.

The Forbes and Lilly Libraries are holding their Edible Book event on Sunday, April 22nd this year, an annual event that crosses culinary arts and language arts with creative free play! And April vacation week is the perfect time to start thinking with your kids about participating and supporting our local libraries!

What is an Edible Book? It’s exactly what it sounds like – community members create their own edible versions of their favorite books (fiction & non-fiction)!  Previous years’ entries have included Eric Carle’s Very Hungry Caterpillar made out of cookies and the Audubon Book of Birds featuring shortbread avian specimens.

Edible Book events have been held worldwide since 1999 and pays tribute to French gastronome Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin’s book The Physiology of Taste!  The event is an opportunity for families to celebrate reading together, as well as an opportunity for creative free play via culinary arts.  

If your family doesn’t want to enter, you can still attend the Edible Book event to check out others’ entries!  All entrants will get a ribbon, and there will be prizes in multiple categories.  The event will take place on Sunday, April 22nd from 2-4pm at the Florence Civic Center, and admission is $5 (kids 10yo and under are free) and goest towards supporting the Forbes and Lilly Libraries.  For more information, call Bonnie at 413-584-7482 or email bonnieburnham@comcast.net. Registration deadline is Monday, April 16th.

[Photo credit: (ccl) Betsy Roe

DIY: Mexican Sugar Skulls

HOW TO MAKE MEXICAN SUGAR SKULLS
A Culinary Folk Art for Day of the Dead
By Sienna Wildfield

Making Mexican Sugar Skulls-52.JPG

In the studio with Hilltown Families Guest Artist Marie Westburg of ArtStar in Williamsburg, MA making Mexican Sugar Skulls for Day of the Dead.  (Photo credit: Sienna Wildfield)

What better avenue for children to explore and discover different cultures than FOOD?!  Right? … We all eat.  And whether it’s a yearly birthday cake, fish on Friday, pancakes on Sunday, or a couple of loaves of challah on a Friday night, most of us routinely and joyfully participate in different food traditions.  The culinary experience of exploring food customs from around the world can bring families an integrated course of study on cultural traditions and arts.

This time of year in Central and Southern Mexico, in preparation for the Mexican holiday El Diá de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), mounds of Sugar Skulls are sold in open air markets.  The Day of the Dead is on November 2nd and we’ve explored this Mexican holiday in a previous post: El Diá de los Muertos (Video & Resources).  Making Mexican Sugar Skulls with your kids is a creative hands-on project that can aid in the exploration of this traditional Mexican Folk Art while affording an opportunity to discuss and participate in one of the various customs of this Mexican celebration.

Hilltown Families Guest Artist Marie Westburg of ArtStar, an art enrichment studio in Williamsburg, MA, recently invited us over to make this sweet Mexican culinary folk art.  In her cozy studio our kids got together and crafted skulls out of sugar and meringue powder and decorated them with bags of colorful icings, beads and sequins.  It’s a fun project to make with a group of friends, but give yourself enough time.  The skulls take 12-24 hours to harden before they can be decorated. To follow is a DIY for this fun seasonal activity:  Read the rest of this entry »

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