Google Lit Trips Puts Literary Characters Back on the Map

Computer program supports and deepens family-friendly literary experiences; encourages sense of place

When springtime showers nix outdoor exploration and playtime, what are adventure-hungry families to do? Check out Google Lit Trips, a computer-based resource that pairs Google Maps with the travels taken by characters in hundreds of great books for readers of all ages and abilities. Ranging in theme and age group appeal from Mem Fox’s classic picture books to a nonfiction chronicle of life in Sudan, Google Lit Trips offers virtual explorations to pair with curiosity about numerous themes and geographic locations.

Using Google Maps’ satellite and street view functions, each Google Lit Trip traces the path followed by characters in a story. Moving along the route traveled can help students to visualize the character’s journey, gain perspective on the distance traveled, and examine the landscape in which each portion of the story took place. The real-life images help to enhance readers’ understanding of the story’s setting, and may help them to better understand the descriptive language that an author used to explain where the characters traveled. Additionally, exploring a Lit Trip can help students develop and practice map skills and sense of direction. While a route guided by words may take shape in a reader’s mind, they may not apply what they know about spatial relationships and maps to what they imagine. However, by imagining a character’s journey while following a map, readers can work on solidifying concepts as basic as north and south, or even the more complex geography of far away places and spaces.

Read the rest of this entry »

YardMap: Make Your Yard a Personal Refuge

Get a Bird’s Eye View of Your Habitat

YardMap is a citizen science project offered by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. The goal of YardMap is to support the lab scientists’ work in understanding bird populations. Families participate by creating maps of the habitat provided within their yard (whether it’s native or not) using Google maps, which are then submitted to the lab…

The average American lawn is filled with lush green grass and some landscaped trees and shrubs. Here in western Massachusetts, we’re lucky enough to be able to live amongst natural and beautiful surroundings like forests, fields, mountains, and water of all types. Even if we have grassy yards, many homes are surrounded by natural habitat that has existed since long before our homes were built. Of course, we do have an impact on the environment around us, but our small communities leave us with the opportunity to work to blend in with nature, rather than set ourselves apart from it.

Natural habitat is incredibly important for supporting the many different kinds of creatures who share your surroundings. Plant and animal populations exist within a delicately balanced system that can easily be influenced by eliminating or drastically changing habitats. One way to ensure that your effect on your surroundings isn’t negative is by planting native species of trees, shrubs, and even flowers in your yard, but with the growing season rapidly coming to an end, what should families do in order to support natural critter habitat? Participate in YardMap!

Read the rest of this entry »

%d bloggers like this: