Vernal Pools: Annual Amphibian Migration

Amphibian migration will be any day now!

On a rainy evening (or two or three) very soon, all over New England, when the snow and ice are almost gone, and the temperature is 40 degrees or more, frogs and salamanders will make their annual spring migration.

 

They wend their way from their upland winter havens to the vernal pools where they hatched to lay their fertilized eggs in the water. Sometimes, however, roads cross these ancient paths, and many of them are killed. The Wendell State Forest Alliance invites families to help our fellow amphibian neighbors avoid this fate by participating as a salamander crossing guard!

Here’s how: Wash your hands (don’t use any lotion), put on rain gear and a reflective vest, take a flashlight and walk to the amphibian crossing closest to your home. Then wet your hands in rainwater, pick them up very carefully and carry them across the road in the direction they were headed. Touching them with dry hands can damage the protective coat on their skin. Ask members of your local Conservation Commission where amphibians crossroads in your town. As this involves activity in the road at night, children must have adult supervision.

The Hitchcock Center in Amherst has instructions for participating as a crossing guard at the Henry Street tunnels on “Big Night,” which you can download here and also apply towards the nearest vernal pool to your home. And Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary in Easthampton has an annual event for Big Night every March, perfect for families with younger children.

Read more about vernal pools in our post, Learning Ahead: Spring Landscape & Vernal Pools.

Lifecycle Studies: Hatching Frog Eggs

Lifecycle Studies: Hatching Frog Eggs

Here in western Massachusetts, one of Mother Nature’s first ways of letting us know that spring has arrived is the chorus that comes during the evening. Peepers and wood frogs add natural music to the wet, muddy, spring landscape, letting everyone and everything within earshot know that winter is finally over. And soon after the evenings get noisy, amphibians get busy! Not long after emerging, ponds and vernal pools become home to hundreds of eggs.

Springtime outdoor exploration with kids is sure to lead to discoveries of egg masses if you live near still or slow-moving water. There’s a lot to be learned just from examining the egg masses themselves, but there’s even more to be learned by watching the eggs hatch, develop, and grow from a gelatinous cluster into full-sized frogs! Families can schedule regular visits to a pond or vernal pool to watch these future-frogs grow, but it’s much easier to see the small daily changes that occur if the eggs are right inside your home or classroom.

Before bringing home an egg mass, do some research and learn to identify the egg masses you’ve found. Read the rest of this entry »

Video: Snake Eating an Egg

%d bloggers like this: