Fibonacci Sequence & Golden Ratio Drive Nature-Based Education

Nature’s Patterns Reveals Mathematical Reasoning

The Fibonacci sequence describes the pattern in which flowers fit the most seeds possible into their centers.

Nature is filled with patterns – spirals, in particular, are especially noticeable in species of plants and animals. Sunflowers, for example, seem to spiral their seeds from their centers in some sort of mathematical pattern. Snail shells, too, show growth rings that become gradually larger as they spiral away from the shell’s center. Evergreen cones, heads of broccoli and cauliflower, and tree branches all display noticeable iterations of this spiraling pattern, too.

The spirals that appear all around us are no accident of nature – while they’re beautiful to look at, their purpose is much more important than vanity alone. Beneath the aesthetically pleasing shapes of petals, seeds, and branches are two fascinating mathematical concepts that explain nature’s tendency to expand in spirals. Read the rest of this entry »

Nature’s Patterns Reveals Mathematical Reasoning

Nature’s Patterns Reveals Mathematical Reasoning

As you gaze into the center of a flower, did you know that you’re regarding an incredible example of mathematical reasoning? Nature’s patterns, as it happens, are deeply rooted in the Fibonacci Sequence and the Golden Ratio.

It’s the ultimate in a marriage between the aesthetic beauty of nature, and its mathematical base that makes it make sense. Read on to discover what a learning opportunity this is for the family to share! There are many resources on-line, in your community, and of course in your backyard to explore these theories.

Read more and see great videos in our post, Fibonacci Sequence & Golden Ratio Drive Nature Based Education.

[Photo credit: (cc) Steve]

 

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Fibonacci Sequence & Golden Ratio Drive Nature Based Education

Nature’s Patterns Reveals Mathematical Reasoning

The Fibonacci sequence describes the pattern in which flowers fit the most seeds possible into their centers.

Nature is filled with patterns – spirals, in particular, are especially noticeable in species of plants and animals. Sunflowers, for example, seem to spiral their seeds from their centers in some sort of mathematical pattern. Snail shells, too, show growth rings that become gradually larger as they spiral away from the shell’s center. Evergreen cones, heads of broccoli and cauliflower, and tree branches all display noticeable iterations of this spiraling pattern, too.

The spirals that appear all around us are no accident of nature – while they’re beautiful to look at, their purpose is much more important than vanity alone. Beneath the aesthetically pleasing shapes of petals, seeds, and branches are two fascinating mathematical concepts that explain nature’s tendency to expand in spirals. Read the rest of this entry »

Q&A: 8 Ways to Make Math Fun at Home

QUESTION AND ANSWERS

In the driveway or on the sidewalk, play Hopscotch Math! Using a grid to play, kids can practice and reinforce number sequencing, odd/even numbers, addition, subtraction and times tables – while having fun!

Deborah Doulette of Whately, MA writes, “How do you bring (fun!) math into your household and engage your kids in real math problems? For example, we play a type of math word game at the dinner table. Would love other suggestions!”

  • Amber Ladley suggests, “We like to cook/bake together. Recipes are great for reading, following directions, learning units of measure, & basic math, including fractions!”
  • Katie O’Hara Edwards suggests, “Check out ‘Bedtime Math Problem‘ on Facebook. They provide fun math problems every night for little kids and big kids.”
  • Katryna Nields suggests, “Yahtzee.”
  • Kara Kitchen suggests, “Darts (multiply, add+subtract).”
  • Carrie St John suggests, “I have a first grader. We use a couple ideas from a book called, Old Dogs, New Math: Homework Help for Puzzled Parents.  I put up a number problem in magnetic numbers on the fridge and leave it to be solved. I save up the pocket change from the week. Once a week I put it out for sorting and counting. We added in the bonus of depositing it into her school savings bank account.”
  • Rebecca Trow Addison suggests, “We do an adding game in the car. We count horses, and my 1st grader remembers how many horses she saw on the morning ride to school (with my husband) and adds that number to the number of horses she sees on the ride home from school (with me). Memory and math.”
  • Jo Buswell Sauriol suggests, “Older children can help you use coupons and line up sale items with coupons. Especially motivating when it is something they want and you won’t buy full price. Also motivating for them to help if you give them a cut of the savings as a bonus!”

[Photo credit: (cc) D. Sharon Pruitt]

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