Learn Local. Play Local.: Plastic Bottles to Electric Cars. Mushrooms to Engineers.

Community-Based Education Highlights
for Western Massachusetts

Bird WalkBird BandingBird FestivalFamily FestivalParents’ Night OutDivinityArchitectureLocal HistoryLabor HistorySilk HistoryWomen’s SuffrageRosie RevereGirls GardeningPlant SaleSoil ScienceElectric CarsNatural HistoryPhenologyMycologyBotanyForest BathingWild FlowersVolunteeringTown Clean-UpLGBTQNAACPADHDSTEMFood SecurityLiterature in TranslationPicture Book ArtComicsMuseum AdventuresThe ClarkWoodstockDouble Edge TheatreBasket WeavingTie-DyeTextilesStar WarsHarry Potter

These are just a few of the community-based learning highlights we featured this week in our eNewsletter for the week, May 4-10, 2019. Click through, peruse our list, and make plans to get out into your community and learn while you play! ♥ Want to have our highlights and spotlights  delivered to your inbox every Thursday? Click here to subscribe! Read the rest of this entry »

Learn Local. Play Local.: Folk Music to Poetry Cafe. Wildflowers to Bird Walks.

Community-Based Education Highlights
for Western Massachusetts

PlacemakingSustainability FestivalCreative Free PlayPark Clean UpVolunteeringWalking MeditationMindful MeditationActivismSkillsharingFood StudiesCommunity SederChocolateBotanyWildflowersArbor DayEvolutionKnittingTextilesSheep ShearingOrnithologyBird WalkEntomologyHerpetologyFrogsSalamandersMason BeesAmerican WoodcockCollaborative ConsumptionCraftingArt SuppliesSecond Hand SaleMuseum AdventuresLibrary AdventuresArt StudiesMusicalYouth TheaterShakespeareMister RogersIndustryLawGovernmentLocal HistoryIndustrial HistoryArchitectureMusic StudiesFolk MusicDrummingWest African MusicIrish MusicStorysongsPoetry CafeParenting WorkshopEarly ChildhoodSocial MediaFirst Aid

These are just a few of the community-based learning highlights we featured this week in our eNewsletter for the wook, April 27-May 3, 2019. Click through, peruse our list, and make plans to get out into your community and learn while you play! ♥ Want to have our highlights and spotlights  delivered to your inbox every Thursday? Click here to subscribe!


Learn Local. Play Local. is supported in part by a grant from the Agawam, Buckland, Deerfield, Gill, Hadley, New Salem, Plainfield, Shelburne Southampton, Tolland, and Westhampton Cultural Councils, local agencies that are supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency.

Learn Local. Play Local.: Peeps to Jelly Beans. Spine Poetry to Easter Baskets.

Community-Based Education Highlights
for Western Massachusetts

Egg HuntsPassoverFarm AnimalsNative SpeciesOrnithologyHerpetologyBatsRural New England HistoryLiving HistoryLocal HistoryCemetery TourMasonryEngineeringSTEMComputer CodingPodcastingHealthy LivingFamily HikeMud SeasonOld Growth TreesEarth DayClimate ChangeGreen New DealGeoscienceMuseum AdventuresPaper CraftsStenciling ArtHarry PotterRembrandtShakespeareImprovMusical TheaterPuppetryFiber ArtsCraft SwapFilm StudiesCommunity SingPianoKlezmer MusicMusic StudiesCreative WritingSpelling BeeLanguage ArtsPublishingMangaCollaborative ConsumptionExperiential LearningToddlersTeensLifelong Learners

These are just a few of the community-based learning highlights we’re featuring this week, April 20-26, 2019… Read the rest of this entry »

Learn Local. Play Local.: Raptors to Folk Art. Postcards to Pancakes.

Community-Based Education Highlights
for Western Massachusetts

HarmonyKids TheaterFilm StudiesBroadway MusicalShakespeareDramaHolocaustMindfulness ImproveMeditative HikeExperiential LearningVolunteeringPark Clean-UpCitizen ScienceCommunity MealCreative Free-PlayNon-CommericalNature-Based LearningEarth Day FestivalSeed BombsWildflowersVernal PoolsNative SpeciesAnimal StudiesBatsHerpetologyBearsMigratory BirdsBirds of PreyRaptorsOrnithologySleddogsMarine BiologyFolk ArtPrintmakingChalk ArtPoetryBookfestGraphic NovelPicture BooksKids Book ClubEvening StorytimeTeen Escape RoomRevolutionary HistoryNative American StudiesPostcardsSoapmakingArcticPiratesEaster BunnyRevolutionary MusterPoliceTouch A TruckFire DepartmentMaker FaireComputer CodingRocketsKineticsPhysicsAeronautics

These are just a few of the community-based learning highlights we’re featuring this week, April 13-19, 2019… Read the rest of this entry »

Learn Local. Play Local.: Slow Art to Matzo. Hero’s Journey to Bird Migrations.

Community-Based Education Highlights
for Western Massachusetts

BalletBroadwayDramaLiterature in TranslationSnow WhiteBeauty and the BeastWomen’s HistoryLocal HistorySleddogsAmerican WoodcockVernal PoolsAmphibiansApril Vacation WeekSummer CampsMovie Theater Birthday PartyFamily CampParents’ Night OutDate NightBaby ShowerEducationEarly Childhood EducationWeek of the Young ChildNature-Based LearningCreative-Free PlaySound ArtMuseum AdventuresSlow Art DayEaster BunnyPassoverRamadanImmigrationRaceIslamic StudiesTEDx TalkHero’s JourneyAnatomy & PhysiologyOrnithologySTEMAstronomyAeronauticsKineticsParenting WorkshopTeen HealthHomeopathy5KRecyclingUpcyclingSustainabilitySeed ExchangeLandscape DesignGardeningFarm to SchoolPancakesMatzaString QuartetOrchestraContradanceFlamencoFiber ArtsAirplanesTrolley CarsMini GolfBasketballKites

These are just a few of the community-based learning highlights we’re featuring this week, April 6-12, 2019… Read the rest of this entry »

Learn Local. Play Local.: Migration to Reconciliation Ecology. Duct Tape to Michelangelo.

Learn Local. Play Local.: Printmaking to Social Justice. Drumming to Farsi Funk.

Learn Local. Play Local.: Hamantaschen to Butter. Neon to Book History.

Hilltown Families on Mass Appeal: Memorial Day as a Catalyst for Learning

Hilltown Families on Mass Appeal:
Memorial Day as a Catalyst for Learning

Hilltown Families and Mass Appeal (a weekday, hour-long lifestyle program on NBC) have teamed up to offer a live monthly segment on WWLP 22News!  Each month, community-based education specialist and Hilltown Families’ Founder, Sienna Wildfield, joins Mass Appeal hosts to talk about ways to engage in your community while supporting the interests and education of your children (and yourselves!).

This monthly segment continued on Monday, May 28, 2018, with Sienna and Lauren talking about how the Memorial Day is the perfect time to show appreciation towards those who have served our country through self-initiated activities while learning via community-based resources.


Mass Appeal is a live weekday program that airs at 11am on 22News (Springfield, MA).

Our next visit to the Mass Appeal studios will be Monday, June 25th, 2018!

Hilltown Families on Mass Appeal: Spring Holidays as a Catalyst for Kindness

Hilltown Families on Mass Appeal:
Spring Holidays as a Catalyst for Kindness

Hilltown Families and Mass Appeal (a weekday, hour-long lifestyle program on NBC) have teamed up to offer a live monthly segment on WWLP 22News!  Each month, community-based education specialist and Hilltown Families’ Founder, Sienna Wildfield, joins Mass Appeal hosts to talk about ways to engage in your community while supporting the interests and education of your children (and yourselves!).

This monthly segment continued on Monday, April 30, 2018 with Sienna and Lauren talking about how the spring holidays are the perfect time to show kindness and appreciation towards others through self-initiated activities while learning via community-based resources.

Click on video for viewing.


Mass Appeal is a live weekday program that airs at 11am on 22News (Springfield, MA).

Our next visit to the Mass Appeal studios will be Monday, May 28th, 2018!

Sense of Place: Presidents’ Day & Freedom to Read

Think about this:

  • What books have you read that were once banned or on a challenged list?
  • What does the freedom to read mean to you?
  • What was the literacy rate among women in the United States in the 18th century? What was it later in the 19th century?
  • How can literacy, the right to read, and the value of reading literature help shape an ethical and compassionate democracy?

Valentine’s Day Through the Lens of Art & History

The Art, History & Paper of Valentines

The American valentine industry was started during the mid-19th century by Esther Howland, a Mt. Holyoke graduate and Worcester native. Often called “The Mother of the Valentine,” Howland was inspired by the beautiful, ornate valentines imported from England and suspected that there might be a market for them in the United States, as well. Through her father’s paper company, she sold her first valentines in 1848 and within a few years was able to begin her own business, the New England Valentine Company.

Mt. Holyoke College graduate, Esther Howland, started the American valentine industry with her beautiful paper valentines sourced through her father’s paper company in the mid-19th century.  Howland, also a Worcester native, began her own business 5 years later in 1848: The New England Valentine Company.

Howland’s valentines featured lacy, cut paper with ornate and decorative images. At Mt. Holyoke College’s Archives and Special Collections there are many examples of Howland’s valentines with designs heavily influenced by Victorian style. By the 1860’s, Esther was selling $100,000 worth of valentines a year.  (That’s over 2 million dollars today!)

In honor of this Mt. Holyoke alumna’s success and contribution to the history of paper goods and Valentine’s Day, the college’s Archives and Special Collections displays a student-curated exhibit case of valentines in the Library’s courtyard. Curious to see some of the collection’s valentines?  Take a look online at the Pinterest board, From MHC With Love.

Esther relied on her father’s local paper company to start the business.  In the mid-19th century these types of mills were more common. Which paper mill is the oldest?  That would be Crane & Co. in Dalton, MA!  Read the rest of this entry »

Sense of Place: Valentine’s Day

Think about this:


Download our Jan/Feb edition of Learning Ahead: Cultural Itinerary for Western Massachusetts for embedded learning opportunities found in cultural resources that exist within the geography, history, and cultural traditions of Western Massachusetts.

Winter Festivals: Living Seasonally through History, Culture & Art

Winter Festivals: Living Seasonally through History, Culture & Art

In 19th century New England, the winter season was a time for gathering and socializing with family, friends, and neighbors. As the fields lay dormant in anticipation off the agricultural season, rural New Englanders used the cold season as a time for meeting friends, having conversations, and visiting with one another. Before the telephone or telegraph, visiting a friend’s home was a way to share news, gossip, and stories.

Besides visiting a friend’s home, other common gathering places were the general store, taverns, and town meetings. Home visits, encounters with neighbors and local businesses allowed New Englanders to strengthen their community ties and reconnect during a time of year that was generally quiet.

Read the rest of this entry »

6 Winter Festivals in Western MA

Northampton Ice Arts Festival

This annual festival has brought temporary ice sculptures to the streets of  Northampton since 2010. Offered as a part of the Northampton Center for the Arts’  February installment of Arts Night Out, the Ice Arts Festival offers the chance to  explore the art of ice carving. Artists work away while passersby can check out the different techniques and tools of the trade. Spectators can watch the participants throughout the day and then enjoy the glistening sculptures at night Visit nohoarts.org to find out this year’s date, time and  sculpture locations.

Easthampton WinterFest

Since 2013, Easthampton has been bringing together wintry celebrations that explore local history and the local landscape such as ice harvesting on Nashawannuck Pond, nature walks with community partners, wildlife talks and demonstrations, and other festivities such as dance parties, horse-drawn wagon rides and more!  To learn about the latest program information for this year, check out:  www.nashawannuckpond.org/winterfest.

Holyoke Canal District Winter Festival

Holyoke’s Canal District Winter Festival offers a weekend of activities to bring to life the city’s historic Canal District neighborhood.  Visitors can explore this interesting part of the city where the canals are evidence of Holyoke’s once thriving industry. Usually in collaboration with Gateway City Arts, past activities have included a Luminaria Parade, dog show, artisan market, musical performances and the annual firefighters vs. police officers rivalry hockey game! www.gatewaycityarts.com.

Read the rest of this entry »

Sense of Place: Winter Social Calls

Think about this:

What are the tools used in sculpting ice? What are the challenges ice sculptors face that other sculptors of different media don’t?

How would families and neighbors gather in the winter before the invention of automobiles and highways? How did the inability to travel far distances impact communities and relationships?

How do winter festivals gather communities together? What types of activities do they host in order to foster connection and togetherness during the colder months?


Download our Jan/Feb edition of Learning Ahead: Cultural Itinerary for Western Massachusetts for embedded learning opportunities found in cultural resources that exist within the geography, history, and cultural traditions of Western Massachusetts.

The Power of Voice: Celebrating African American History

Celebrating African American History through Poetry

February is National African American History Month in the United States. It is a time to honor the work, achievements and contributions of African Americans. It is also a time to remember the struggle for civil rights and the importance of equality, civic action, social justice and solidarity.

In our Jan/Feb edition of Learning Ahead: Cultural Itinerary for Western Massachusetts we discussed the power of voice and words as illustrated by Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Continuing this exploration of the inspirational power of words, let’s take a closer look at two poems by African Americans that illustrate the power of voice and words: Langston Hughes and Audre Lorde.  Read the rest of this entry »

African American History in Western Massachusetts

Harriet Tubman & The Underground Railroad

In addition to your literary explorations of African Americans’ creativity and contributions to U.S. literature, explore African American History Month in Western Massachusetts through the different cultural organizations and institutions that educate the public on the history of African Americans in our region.

One of the most significant pieces of New England history is the Underground Railroad, a network of secret routes, stops, and places throughout 14 northern states that were established to help escaped slaves to freedom.

Read the rest of this entry »

Art and The Civil Rights Movement

Norman Rockwell’s The Problem We All Live With

Norman Rockwell’s The Problem We All Live With, painted in 1963, is considered an iconic image of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States. The painting depicts six year-old Ruby Bridges walking to school accompanied by four U.S. marshals. As part of desegregation, Ruby was the first African American student to attend the William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans, Louisiana.  Read the rest of this entry »

Local Learning Resources on The Underground Railroad

Sojourner Truth: Connecting Local Places with National History

The David Ruggles Center for Early Florence History & Underground Railroad in Florence, MA, features The Ross Homestead which is on both the National  Register of Historic Places and the National Park Services Underground Railroad Network to Freedom. The center offers walking tours of Florence including the African-American history trail, Sojourner Truth’s house, and other abolitionist sites. Additionally, there is a memorial statue of Sojourner Truth in Florence, MA, to honor her life and work. A former slave, abolitionist and social activist, Truth lived in Florence from 1843-1856. The Sojourner Truth Memorial organization offers a free map on their website of a self-guided walking tour of Sojourner’s house and historic sites. Read more in our post, Sojourner Truth Memorial: American and Western MA History. Read the rest of this entry »

The Ripple: The River Knows the Way

Following Water

Part of our local Deerfield River watershed in Western MA

Part of our local Deerfield River watershed in Western MA

Teachers often repeat the same lesson; in fact, they have to because, in the act of renewing civilization, they carry the past into the present and hand it off to the future.

One thing I find myself teaching again and again is: “It is impossible to get lost in the woods—all you have to do to find your way is follow the water.”

Follow the water and you’ll never be lost. That maxim has a zen-ish, new-agey ring to it, even a poetry. But it is based on the hard physical fact that all places on the terrestrial earth are composed of watersheds. Read the rest of this entry »

Ice Harvesting: Local History, Literature & Culture

Local Living History & Ice Harvesting

Filling the Ice House (1934) Harry Gottlieb. Oil on canvas, 40 3/8 x 60 3/8 in. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Transfer from the U.S. Department of Labor, 1964.1.19

Historically, living without refrigerators in New England required strategies for prolonged food storage and preservation. In the November/December Seasons edition of Learning Ahead, we looked at different forms of food preservation such as curing, salting, and canning. Early New Englanders didn’t have the luxury of refrigerators, but they did harvest ice from frozen lakes and ponds in order to keep food stored without spoiling. The frozen chunks of ice harvested were kept insulated by materials such as sawdust in a dark, cool place so that the ice would last beyond the winter months.  Read the rest of this entry »

Ice Harvesting: Community Events & Resource

Ice Harvesting: Community Events & Resource

Throughout the winter, check our list of Weekly Suggested Events for community events and demonstrations of ice harvesting. Here are three featured resources in Western MA to add to your itinerary:

Old Sturbridge Village in Sturbridge.

Fire & Ice Days is an annual celebration with ice harvesting demonstrations showing how 19th century Americans adapted their lifestyles to the cold New England winters.

Read the rest of this entry »

Literary Explorations of Ice Harvesting

Henry David Thoreau & “The Pond in Winter”

Ice harvesting is embedded within the history and cultural traditions of New England. So much so, in fact, that it also influenced the literary reflections of  writers such as Henry David Thoreau who described the harvesting of ice in his chapter, “The Pond in Winter,” from Walden. As you explore ice harvesting through  living history demonstrations and artifacts from the past, read Thoreau’s chapter on  “The Pond in Winter” for historical understanding from a literary perspective.  Read the rest of this entry »

Sense of Place: Ice Harvesting

Think about this:

What were the challenges of ice harvesting that the modern refrigerator eliminates in terms of food preservation and food storage?

How did ice harvesting force New Englanders to think about their daily lives all year round? (Reread Thoreau’s passage for a hint!) How did harvesting ice connect people with the seasons and their natural environments?

Given early New Englanders’ dependency on natural resources, what challenges did New Englanders face that we no longer worry about given our modern technologies? What did they not worry about?


Download our Jan/Feb edition of Learning Ahead: Cultural Itinerary for Western Massachusetts for embedded learning opportunities found in cultural resources that exist within the geography, history, and cultural traditions of Western Massachusetts.

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Martin Luther King Jr. & The Power of Voice

Inspiration through Voice:
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” Speech

During the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. called for an end to racism and the enacting of civil rights legislation (see the short documentary, The March). From the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C., King’s speech was delivered to an audience of over 250,000 people. The speech, now known as “I Have a Dream,” is considered one of the most important moments in the American Civil Rights Movement.

On Martin Luther King Jr. Day (3rd Monday in January), take a moment to read (or listen to!) Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream.” This speech is a defining example of the power of voice. It is a reminder of how words, voice, stories, ideas have the ability to inspire and enact positive social change to better our communities and make them more resilient and compassionate.

King’s speech speaks to the value and importance of kindness through civic engagement and community service. Finding ways to serve your local community also reveals opportunities to learn something new, meet neighbors and engage in intergenerational dialogue with others. Community service is an empowering action. Not only does it enrich our local communities, but it also enriches our own experience through the learning of new skills and activities.


Download our Jan/Feb edition of Learning Ahead: Cultural Itinerary for Western Massachusetts for embedded learning opportunities found in cultural resources that exist within the geography, history, and cultural traditions of Western Massachusetts.

Annual MLK Jr. Community Celebrations in Western MA

Annual MLK Jr. Celebrations in Western MA

Martin Luther King Jr. spoke out against civil injustice and fought for the civil rights of black Americans. His work to create a just and peaceful society is a reminder of how important civic engagement and service is in sparking positive social change and the formation of ethical communities that champion diversity, openness, compassion, and solidarity. In honor of Martin Luther King Jr.’s work, many organizations and volunteers dedicate themselves to a day of community service in honor of his commitment to social justice.

On the 3rd Monday in January, the celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day offers families a three-day weekend – a treasure that can be used to engage in meaningful community-based learning opportunities. Families can take advantage of this special day honoring Dr. King’s work and lasting impact on our country by taking part in community celebrations, giving their time to be part of a day of service, or attending educational screenings and performances.  Read the rest of this entry »

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